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The IT Weekly Archive for the Office of Information Technology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
November 12
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, November 12, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

November 12, 2018

 

Security Awareness, Title IX, and FERPA training

Over the last several weeks, we have included information about the three mandatory online training classes for university faculty and staff.  The deadline to complete the training is quickly approaching!  To see who on your staff has completed their training, follow the instructions on the OIT website.

 

At the end of the year, the Office of Information Technology, the Office of Title IX, and the Registrar’s Office will report to the Board of Trustees the completion rates for the Knoxville campus.  Based on numbers reported from IRIS, completion rates for UTK employees assigned to the training are below. Please encourage your team to complete the training as soon as possible.

 

  • IT Security Awareness Training – Regular Employee, IT Staff, Executive (due 11/30/2018)
    All regular, UTK employees are required to complete this training
    As of November 7, 43% of the required employees have satisfied the requirement.  

  • Title IX Training (due 12/3/2018)
    All 100% employment, regular faculty and staff are required to complete this training.
    As of November 7, 81% of the required employees have satisfied the requirement.

  • FERPA Training (due 11/30/2018)
    All regular, UTK employees are required to complete this training.
    As of November 7, 35% of the required employees have satisfied the requirement.

 

To verify that you have completed the mandatory training, log into K@TE and review your transcript.

 

If you or your team need assistance logging into or accessing the training, contact the OIT HelpDesk.


Can you hear me now?

Enhanced Cellular Coverage on Campus

 

During the summer and early fall, OIT oversaw the installation of enhanced cellular coverage in several areas on campus, including Ayres Hall, Circle Park, Hesler Biology Builidng, Stokely Management Center, and Taylor College of Law.  These sites have been added to the campus Distributed Antenna System (DAS); Verizon Wireless is currenlty the only participating carrier for these locations.

 

Neyland Stadium, Thompson Boling Arena and the Veterinary Medical Center were already on the campus DAS; carriers for these areas include Verizon, AT&T, and US Cellular.

 

We realize access to all forms of wireless communications continues to grow and we are making it a priority to ensure the Knoxville campus has adequate coverage.  We are partnering with our vendors and wireless carriers to provide these services in additional campus buildings and outdoor spaces.


Customize your Canvas homepage

Spring 2019 Canvas course shells are now available to faculty and it might be time to give some thought to the basic structure of your course.

 

Research has shown that the design of online course sites is an important factor for student learning and success. Consistent course design may be one of the most vital factors. Students have reported difficulty navigating course sites across the curriculum. Course sites that are designed to a standard allow students to concentrate on the content, not on hunting for information.

 

The course Homepage is a great place to start, and it’s actually quite easy to create a Homepage that is engaging, informative, and easy to navigate. We’ve developed an online tutorial to assist you.

 

Just need help getting started? Want to rethink your entire course site structure? Interested in a review of your course site compared to research-based standards? Thinking about a total redesign of your course? OIT Instructional Support staff are ready to assist you. Contact the OIT HelpDesk online to get started.


Windows Server 2008 Retirement

Microsoft Windows Server 2008 reaches end-of-life on January 14, 2020.  After that date Microsoft will no longer provide security patches, bug fixes, or performance enhancements for that operating system.  Running unsupported software exposes the university to additional risk, and is against the Acceptable Use Policy, IT0110 – section 2h:  Use only supported and patched applications and operating systems on university-owned devices. Exceptions must be documented and approved by the Campus Authority or their designee.

 

OIT is in the process of working with the campus to retire all Windows Server 2008 servers, both physical and virtual, before January 2020. 

 

If you know you are running Windows Server 2008 machines and are ready to begin the replacement / retirement process, contact the OIT HelpDesk online to get on the schedule!


Instructional Technology Community of Practice (ITCoP)

Explore Technology in the Library

UTK faculty and GTAs are invited to join the ITCoP's roving meetings as we explore teaching and learning with technology across campus. The November meeting will be held in The Studio in Hodges Library, Room 235, on Wednesday, November 28th, from 12:20-1:10 pm. Come see and experience learning like never before through video production, a digital anatomy table, the Virtual Reality Room and more!

 

Visit the ITCoP website for more information.


WordStat by Provalis Research, Inc.

WordStat is software that performs high-speed content analysis on text data. This process is also known as text mining. You may create your own categorization dictionaries within WordStat or import pre-existing subject dictionaries. It can also extract topics automatically using either cluster analysis or latent semantic analysis.

 

Learn more about WordStat on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

Here's a selection of topics that will be covered in workshops this week:

 

·       Getting Started with Arc

·       Text Analysis Using JMP

·       Microsoft Excel 2 (Forms, Charts, and Macros)

 

View our calendar of upcoming workshops and register to attend.

 

Can't make it to class or want to learn about another topic? Check out our online training sessions.


National Fraud Day

Yesterday, November 11th, was Veterans Day. We want to take a moment to thank all Veterans for their service.

 

Yesterday was also National Fraud Day. Unfortunately, fraud is a worsening problem. According to Javelin Strategy & Research, there were 16.7 million victims of identity fraud in 2017, beating the previous year’s record high. The total cost of that identity theft was a staggering $16.8 billion, and nearly a third of US consumers had to be notified of some sort of breach (remember the Equifax breach? There’s a good chance that you were one of the 143 million people affected by it). Account takeovers also tripled in 2017, causing a total of $5.1 billion in damages. On an individual level, each victim paid an average of $290 out-of-pocket and spent 15 hours trying to resolve the fraud. Not the way I’d like to spend my spare time or money!

 

So how can we as consumers protect ourselves? Passwords are a great place to start. Of those that participated in the Consumer Fraud Awareness survey by Shred-It, half felt that their security practices made them vulnerable (49%) and admitted to reusing passwords and PINs (51%). Clearly, consumers understand that bad password habits make them vulnerable, but they don’t change these habits. Perhaps the thought of having a strong password for each online account is too daunting. If you feel that way, maybe a password manager is an option to consider. At the very least, make sure that your financial accounts have strong passwords, even if it requires a little extra effort to remember them. Another option is good old-fashioned pen and paper. While you don’t want to leave Post-it notes with your most sensitive passwords on every surface of your cubicle or office, writing down an important password and keeping it a fireproof lockbox is never a bad idea when the alternative is creating a weak password or reusing a password.

 

Finally, keep an eye on your accounts. You won’t be able to respond to an incident if you don’t know that it’s happened. Check your bank statements frequently and don’t forget that you’re entitled to one free credit check a year from each of the Big Three credit reporting agencies. If you spread these checks out throughout the year, you can check your credit at annualcreditreport.com for free every few months to make sure that someone hasn’t stolen your identity and is opening up lines of credit in your name.

 

Article: https://threatpost.com/threatlist-despite-fraud-awareness-password-reuse-persists-for-half-of-u-s-consumers/138846/


Have questions or need assistance? Contact the HelpDesk.

help.utk.edu   |   865-974-9900   |   online chat

...

Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.


 

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November 05
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, November 5, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

November 5, 2018

 

Time’s Running Out…

If you have not completed your 2018 Security Awareness training, you have until November 30, 2018, to receive credit.

 

Training is required for full-time faculty and staff. The three training tracks, standard, IT professional, and executive, are assigned based on your title.  Training can usually be completed in 45-60 minutes.

 

Visit the 2018 Security Awareness Training to sign in.

 

This training is required annually through UT Policy IT0123 - Security Awareness, Training, and Education.   If you have completed cybersecurity training through your partnership with another institution, you can request this training fulfill the Mandatory Training Requirement for 2018.  To submit this request, log in to K@Te and select ‘Home’ from the left menu.  Choose ‘Universal Profile’ and select the ‘Transcripts’ tab.  Choose the three dots (…) on the right and select ‘Add External Training’ and follow the instructions.

 

Attention Deans, Directors, and Department Heads: If you would like to confirm who on your staff has completed their training, we have provided instructions on the OIT website.


Printing PDFs

Have you or your students experienced problems when printing PDF documents, especially from within Canvas?  PDFs are often problematic depending on how they were created and uploaded.    In general, if you download and save your PDF first, before attempting to print, you should have better results.  Saving it first will clear hidden tags in the document that may be preventing it from printing correctly.   First, open your document, do a ‘Save As’ to save it to the local drive on your computer or to your H: drive. Close the original document from wherever you accessed it.  Then open your saved document to print.

Stata MP by Stata Corp

Stata MP is a general purpose package for statistics, data management, and graphics. You can control it using its programming language or its graphical user interface. Stata is designed to be easily extendable and there are many hundreds of free add-ons available for it in Internet repositories. Stata is particularly strong in time series, panel data, and the analysis of complex, non-random samples. Its data must fit into your computer’s main memory, limiting the amount of data it can handle.

 

Learn more about Stata MP on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

Here's a selection of topics that will be covered in workshops this week:

 

·       Apple iMovie

·       Best Practices for Presentations

·       Cloud Storage Options at UTK

·       Microsoft Excel

·       Post Hoc Tests for Main Effects

·       R: Complex Mixed Models

 

View our calendar of upcoming workshops at workshops.utk.edu and register to attend.

 

Can't make it to class or want to learn about another topic? Check out our online training sessions.


Mobile Phishing

Hopefully you’re aware of the dangers of phishing and know how to spot the danger in an email. When it comes to mobile devices, there are several avenues that attackers can use in addition to email. It is common for criminals to send text messages or make phone calls claiming to be from a trusted organization, asking for your information. In some cases, they may even claim your account is already compromised and you need to act quickly or else the account will be deactivated. Urgency or ultimatums (“give us your credentials or something bad will happen”) are a huge red flag. No legitimate service should ask for your personal information in this manner. If you’re concerned about your account, hang up and do not reply, find the legitimate contact information for the organization in question, and call them to ask about their account breach and recovery process. Be sure to inform them about the suspicious call/SMS that you received.

 

Popular mobile phishing attempts include pretending to be your bank, pretending to be the IRS, claiming that charges will be filed against you if you do not pay a fine, claims of fake prizes and windfalls, and pretending to be a popular service and sending malicious links in the hopes of getting people to click on them. Sophisticated criminals may even know your place of employment and pretend to be from your business.

 

What to do if you believe you have received a phishing call/text:

 

  • Remember: No government agency, bank, or legitimate business will ask for personal information via text.
  • Don’t panic. Scammers often try to create a false sense of urgency. If you’re worried about an account, take your time to find the correct contact information for that organization.
  • Never click on links or return phone calls to any numbers in unsolicited texts or emails.
  • Never give information over the phone to an unsolicited call. Scammers can spoof phone numbers to pose as, for example, your local bank branch. Hang up, find the correct contact info, and initiate the call yourself.
  • Don’t respond to unsolicited messages. Any response at all will let the scammer know that your number is active and incentivizes them to keep trying.
  • Report the message or phone call to your carrier’s spam or scam reporting service (See Reporting below).
  • After reporting the text to your carrier, delete the message.

 

REPORTING:

To report spam texts to Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, or Sprint, forward* the text to 7726 (SPAM). You should get an immediate reply thanking you for reporting the spam and asking for the spammer’s number. Reply with the phone number that sent the spam text. You should then get another reply thanking you for helping and possibly carrier specific tips for blocking that sender.

 

You can also file a complaint with the FTC for unwanted telemarketing, text, or spam.

 

*To forward a text message on iPhone, navigate to the text that you want to forward, tap and hold on that bubble until “copy” and “more” pop up (Be careful not to click on any links while doing this!). Click on “more” and a forward arrow will show up at the bottom of the screen.


Have questions or need assistance? Contact the HelpDesk.

help.utk.edu   |   865-974-9900   |   online chat

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Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.


 

Join/Leave the IT Weekly

Archive now available

 

October 29
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 29, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter 

October 29, 2018

 

Great News for Faculty Using Tablets in the Classroom

OIT is happy to announce a new reward program for full-time UTK faculty who prefer to be “untethered” from laptops and are already using tablets in their classroom.  Eligible faculty may apply for the Faculty Untethered Teaching Reward (FUTR) which will supply a Microsoft Surface to select applicants*.  To qualify, you must meet the following criteria:

 

  • Full-time faculty who use a tablet as their primary machine.
  • Faculty must be teaching during the 2018-2019 academic year.
  • Have not received a computer through the Computer Upgrade Program (CUP) since November 30, 2015.
  • Your current tablet must be three years old or older (purchased on or before 11/30/2015)

 

Learn more about the program and apply online today. Deadline for application is November 30, 2018.

*There is a limited amount of funding for this initiative.  Should demand exceed funding, requests will be honored on a first-come, first serve basis.


 

Upcoming Training Deadlines

The university has moved several mandatory online training to K@TE this year.  One of the benefits of using K@TE is our ability to track the assignment and completion of mandatory training in IRIS.  Below is a list of training assigned during 2018.  Please ensure that your department is both aware of the training and completes the training by the deadlines listed below. 

 

If you are not sure if your staff has completed their training, please have someone in your office with access to IRIS execute report ZHR_QUALCOMP_REP, using your organization unit, qualification, and completion date to get a clear picture of your unit’s status.

 

Security Awareness Training: due by 11/30/2018

  • Qualification: 50273441
  • Completion Date: 12/31/2018

 

Title IX Training: due by 12/3/2018

  • Qualification: 50275035
  • Completion Date: 12/3/2018

 

The FERPA Training completions in K@TE can be found in IRIS using the ‘Attendee List’ via PSV1.

 

FERPA Training: due by 11/30/2018

  • Qualification: 50336687
  • Completion Date: 11/30/2018

 

If you need assistance with K@TE, contact Human Resources at 6-8847.


 

Learn more about Cloud Storage

Are you looking for a place to save your files, documents, and school work that is accessible from anywhere?  Do you need to share and collaborate with your classmates and coworkers? OIT has contracts in place with Microsoft and Google to provide safe and reliable storage options for university faculty, staff, and students.  Microsoft OneDrive and Google Drive not only provide an incredible amount of file storage but also options for collaborative activities with collogues around the world.

 

Sign up online to learn about the different cloud storage options here at UT and the best practices for using them. The next scheduled class is on November 6 at 9:40 am in Communications, Room 43, Classroom C.

 

If you are unable to attend this class and want to learn more about Microsoft OneDrive and Google Drive, check out our Lynda.com.
*For easy access when subscribing to the playlist, log in to Lynda.com first from 
oit.utk.edu/lynda.

 


 

OIT Suggestion Box

Here is a round-up of the most popular and recent editions to the OIT Suggestion Box.  If you have suggestions for OIT or would like to vote on any of the current suggestions, visit the OIT Suggestion Box.

 

Most Popular

Gmail for faculty and staff

Multifactor security

Cloud-based project management solution

 

Recent Additions

Contactless student ID cards on Apple Wallet

Add Volprint printers in more locations on campus.


 

SPSS Statistics by SPSS, an IBM company

SPSS Statistics is the most widely used statistics package at UT. It does a broad range of statistics and graphics, and it is easy to learn and use. It is also easy to transfer data from SPSS into R or SAS to access any esoteric analyses. While most users prefer the SPSS easy-to-use GUI interface, more advanced users can take advantage of its programming language. The SPSS programming language can be used to automate repetitive tasks, to leave an audit trail of the steps you took, and to get the package to do something that it was not originally designed to do.

 

Learn more about SPSS Statistics on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


 

Upcoming OIT Workshops

Here's a selection of topics that will be covered in workshops this week:

 

·         Conjoint Analysis in Question Pro

·         Creating Instruction with Camtasia

 

View our calendar of upcoming workshops at workshops.utk.edu and register to attend.

 

Can't make it to class or want to learn about another topic? Check out our online training sessions.


 

Online Holiday Shopping

With the holiday’s right around the corner, many of us will begin the task of holiday shopping.  As you do so, it is important to be aware that the retail industry is an increasingly attractive target for criminals looking to steal credit card data. 

 

Whether shopping online or in store, it is important that you protect your personal information so that you can avoid being a victim of identity theft. But first, you might ask, “How do I know if my identity has been stolen?”  With the increase in retailer data breaches, consumers must take it upon themselves to closely monitor their account activity. The following are some examples of changes that could indicate someone has accessed your information: 

 

·         Unusual or unexplainable charges on your bills

·         Phone calls or bills from accounts, products, or services that you do not have

·         Failure to receive regular bills or mail 

·         New, strange accounts appearing on your credit report

·         Unexpected denial of your credit card 

 

Several habits can help protect you from online identity theft:  

·         Guard your information online. Never provide your personal information to unsolicited emails and advertisements. Holiday deals may be tempting, but checking the retailer’s website first can better protect your information. 

·         Clear your logins and passwords. This is especially important if you are working on a public or shared computer.

·         Pay for online purchases with your credit card, which has better guarantees under federal law then your online payment services or your debit card. 

·         Always verify that you are on a familiar website with security controls before entering personal data.


 

Have questions or need assistance? Contact the HelpDesk.

help.utk.edu   |   865-974-9900   |   online chat

...

Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.


 

 

Join/Leave the IT Weekly

Archive now available

 

October 22
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 22, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

October 22, 2018

 

2019 Computer Upgrade Program

The FY19 Computer Upgrade Program is now underway. 

 

The Computer Upgrade Program (CUP) is a centrally funded program designed to upgrade the computer equipment for UTK faculty and staff once every four years.  OIT works with Deans, Directors, and Department Heads to fulfill requests.  If you believe you are eligible, contact your departmental representative for assistance.

 

Approved faculty or staff members may choose to purchase one of the program recommended configurations or configure a custom machine on one of the University’s contract vendor websites. Reimbursement for CUP purchases is limited to the cost of the standard configurations.  This year’s standard configurations for both Windows and Apple machines are high-powered machines with solid-state drives, I7 processors, and include the 4-year warranties with accident care. 

 

Additional information about this program is available on the OIT website.


OIT Offers Website Assistance for Departments

Can I get help with our departmental website?

Yes. To get started, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or by phone at 865-974-9900.

 

What happens after I request website assistance?

Based on the type of help you request, we’ll begin with a consultation to determine the goals and scope of your request. We generally work with your department for up to 40 hours at no cost to your department. Anything beyond that may require fees.

 

Can you help with structuring the content and the overall design?  

From defining your goals and designing the website to creating custom images and applying the official UT branding, we’ll help you create an approach to address your audiences’ needs effectively. Most of our web design work is built with WordPress.org, but we can work with plain HTML/CSS coding. Before turning your site over to you, we’ll train you on how to maintain your website.

 

What are my hosting options?

OIT’s VolWeb service is available for website hosting. Volweb is a Linux-based LAMP server and can be used to build websites, compile programs, edit files, and more. Additionally, you can request a MySQL database for database-driven websites and applications.

 

Can you create custom features for my site?

OIT’s Application Development staff supports PHP and .NET platforms. The costs for custom development requests are determined on a case-by-case basis. 

 

Can I control who has access to my department’s site content? 

Yes, you can use the Central Authentication Service (CAS) or Shibboleth for authentication.

 

How do I track whether the website is successful?

OIT offers consultation services for the integration of Google Analytics on your website.


SigmaPlot by Systat Software, Inc.

SigmaPlot is a scientific graphing and visualization software package with advanced curve fitting, a vector-based programming language, and macro capability. The software is controlled through the graphical user interface that is modeled after Microsoft Office. SigmaPlot contains over 100 graph types, and the user interface allows detailed manipulation of every graph object. SigmaPlot also includes access to 50 statistical tests which can be used for basic data analysis.

 

Learn more about SAS on OIT’s Research Software website0.

.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

Here's a selection of topics that will be covered in workshops this week:

 

·         Adobe Lightroom

·         Microsoft Access 2

 

View our calendar of upcoming workshops at workshops.utk.edu and register to attend.

 

Can't make it to class or want to learn about another topic? Check out our online training sessions.


Pumpkin Patching? … No Just Patching...

Scary cyber criminals are constantly looking for a way into your accounts. This often happens one of two ways: phishing, or an attacker exploiting an existing vulnerability in some program running on your computer. While we continue to warn about the danger of phishing and how you can spot the danger, there are other ways to make sure your device does not become compromised. Luckily, you don’t have to put in nearly as much effort to stay safe as cyber criminals need to put in in order to compromise you. Protecting yourself by updating software installed on your computer is one of the easiest ways to keep your device safe.

 

Every program you run on your machine can add potential vulnerabilities. Unpatched vulnerabilities are akin to leaving your door ajar in a spooky neighborhood: it’s an inviting target that can make a criminal’s job much simpler. Updating your software regularly, besides adding new features, will often patch existing vulnerabilities, shutting and locking the door to attackers. This makes staying up to date on software patches a priority.

 

If your application has an option to check for updates automatically, you should always select this option. Your program will check for updates regularly without you having to remember to check. For other applications, you’ll have to check yourself, typically in the program’s settings. If you are unsure about how to update one or more of your applications, how to configure a program to update automatically if the option exists, or how to check if you are up to date, contact the OIT HelpDesk.

 

While staying up to date is critical, don’t be tricked into downloading malware disguised as a bogus update to a commonly used application. NEVER click on an unsolicited link in an email or while browsing the web that claims to be an update (i.e. Adobe Flash or Microsoft Office). If you believe you need to update, navigate that application’s update interface or go to the company’s official website.


Have questions or need assistance? Contact the HelpDesk.

help.utk.edu   |   865-974-9900   |   online chat

...

Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.


 

Join/Leave the IT Weekly

Archive now available

 

October 15
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly October 15, 2018

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

 

October 15, 2018

 

macOS Mojave, version 10.14, now available

Here we go again!  Apple has just released its latest operating system, macOS Mojave.   As tempted as you might be to upgrade, be cautious and upgrade your operating system only after you have verified that all of your favorite applications will work with the newer OS.   But, BEWARE!  Depending on your hardware and current OS, Apple may roll the upgrade to Mojave into their normal operating system updates.  If you are not careful and you just select ‘Update All’, you may get the Mojave upgrade along with all of the standard updates.  To uncouple the standard updates from the Mojave OS upgrade, click on the ‘More’ button to expand your choices.   You can then click the desired Update buttons and leave the Mojave upgrade for another time, allowing you to get your operating system updates without being forced to upgrade to Mojave.

 

OIT’s recommendation is to always wait a few months until Apple releases the first, or even the second patch, and vendors have an opportunity to correct incompatibilities between their products and Mojave.  Some vendors have cautioned against upgrading due to incompatibilities with their software, such as with some Adobe Creative Cloud applications, Google Drive, etc.     If you do decide to proceed, please be sure to back up your data and locate any media and/or license codes for your applications prior to initiating any upgrade. 

 

If you have any questions or need assistance, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.


How to Spot an Email Scam: Tip 3

One way to spot an email scam is to check the aesthetics.  Phishing emails often contain convincing logos, links to actual company websites, legitimate phone numbers, and e-mail signatures of actual employees.  If the email meets some of the other email scam criteria, you should be wary.  Contact the organization directly with a known phone number to verify the request. Do not call the number provided in the email.

 

As always, you can contact the OIT HelpDesk to verify the legitimacy of the message.

 

Learn more about how to spot an email scam on OIT’s website.


Learn to Design Conjoint Surveys in Question Pro

Do you need to apply conjoint analysis in your study? Attend OIT’s face-to-face workshop! Conjoint analysis is based on a main effects analysis-of-variance model, and is one method that survey researchers and statisticians use assess the importance of multiple factors used in making decisions. For example, marketing researchers may use conjoint analysis to determine what price consumers are willing to pay for specific features or products, whereas health program coordinators may use conjoint analysis to predict patient adherence to various treatment regimens.

 

Using QuestionPro, participants will gain hands on experience designing conjoint survey questions and analyzing data. Examples of conjoint studies within different fields will be presented to encourage a discussion of methodology, survey design, and analytical techniques.

 

Register Online


SAS

SAS is a suite for statistical analysis, data management, and graphics. There are two recommended ways to run SAS: SAS itself, using its original program editor; SAS Studio, a more modern interface for both programming and menu-based analysis. Other products included in the Education Analytical Suite are Enterprise Miner, used for data mining, and Text Miner, which can extract concepts or sentiment from large volumes of text. A comprehensive list of SAS software included is shown on the vendor’s Education Analytical Suite web page.

 

Learn more about SAS on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

Here's a selection of topics that will be covered in workshops this week:

 

·         Automated Coding and Insights in Nvivo12

·         Creating a Student Portfolio with WordPress.com

·         ePortfolios for Developing and Assessing Student Professional Competencies

·         Microsoft Access 1 (Basic)

·         QuestionPro Introduction

·         QuestionPro for Qualtrics Users

 

View our calendar of upcoming workshops at workshops.utk.edu and register to attend.

 

Can't make it to class or want to learn about another topic? Check out our online training sessions.


Cybersecurity and Research

Grant-funded research projects are exciting. Imagine being a campus researcher leading such a project: you've defined a problem, spent hours — including evenings and weekends — writing a grant, and you've been selected from a competitive field to receive the award. Now you have a limited amount of time to build your team, execute your plan, and reach your research goal.

 

One common factor among scientists, no matter which discipline they belong to or how complex the project may be, is the use of computing resources. Researchers use computers for simulations, data capture, storage, sharing, and analysis, as well as project management, collaboration, and more utilitarian tasks like e-mailing, scheduling, and maintaining websites. Using computing resources inevitably come cybersecurity concerns. Even if the use of computer resources is minimal, threats such as ransomware and usurpation of your computers for a BOTNET or SPAM can seriously impede your research. Some projects will have a clear challenge around regulated data (e.g., HIPAA for certain types of health information and defense regulations for certain types of classified data), but cybersecurity requirements may be less clear.

 

There are specific cybersecurity challenges for grant-funded science projects, and the Information Security community can help resolve those challenges.

 

Grant-funded science projects face a number of unique challenges related to cybersecurity:

·            Projects are rarely large enough to warrant hiring personnel dedicated to information security.

·            The limited lifetime of a project makes them laser-focused (sometimes literally!) on their scientific goals.

·            Research can require specialized computing infrastructure that is difficult to update and challenges common information security practices.

·            There is a common misunderstanding that an open research project that doesn't have confidentiality requirements has no cybersecurity concerns.

·            Scientists may be offered (often contradictory) information security advice, leaving them feeling anxious, overwhelmed, and uncertain about how to begin addressing cybersecurity issues with respect to their research projects and data.

 

Five lessons in how OIT can work with researchers:

 

1.          LISTEN - IT and research staff must strive to communicate and bridge the cultural gap between their communities. To effectively support research, IT staff must have a clear understanding of the concerns of the research staff about the integrity of their research project. Mapping those concerns to cybersecurity risks is the end goal.

2.         RECOGNIZE THE DIFFERENCE - IT controls (e.g., firewall policies) that make sense for administrative computing can hinder the collaboration required by a research project that spans multiple organizations. A research-centric approach such as a science DMZ may be one way to bridge the gap between administrative and research computing.

3.         PRIORITIZE - Research projects are typically time-sensitive. Clear communication between the IT practitioners and the research staff is important when identifying where cybersecurity is most critical. This promotes the prioritization of recommended actions that will deliver the most bang for the buck in a short amount of time.

4.         NEVER ASSUME - Research staff may assume that a level of cybersecurity protections (controls) exist. CAUTION! Never assume; ASK. You may assume a firewall exists and is actively protecting your data when the very opposite may be the case.

 

When your project depends on information technology resources at UTK, involve OIT as EARLY as possible; start the conversation with the Office of Research & Engagement early to ensure that your requirements are known, IT risks are identified and prioritized.

 

Engaging OIT starts with a call to HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.


Have questions or need assistance? Contact the HelpDesk.

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October 09
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 9, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

October 8, 2018

 

Can’t find what you are looking for?  Check out the new search for www.utk.edu!

This summer, OIT launched a new and improved search engine for utk.edu websites. The new web search is faster, allows for more granular site searches, and provides a better overall search experience. To access the new search, visit search.utk.edu or use the search box in the footer of most UT websites. A university system-wide search is also available at search.tennessee.edu.


Record a Better Online Lecture 

Need a brief recording to introduce yourself to your online class; cover new content and post it online for anytime access for your students; explain a challenging concept with visuals; or, annotate assignments? It’s very important to have high-quality audio – the better the audio quality, the more accurate auto-captioning tools will work! 

 

With that in mind, OIT now offers Mic Kits for check out that include a high-quality microphone with a portable mini sound “booth.” You can also check out an iPad and a portable green screen (green screen allows for a digital background to be placed behind you). 

 

Visit Teaching Tools: Lecture Recording Equipment for more information or to reserve a Mic Kit! 

 

PLEASE NOTE:  Due to decreasing demand, OIT has retired the iPad Loan Program which allowed for check out of up to 20 devices for student classroom use.


No More Columns or Cramped Seating: OIT'S New Training Space

OIT has created a new training space for workshop attendees.  This training lab isn’t just a room with new computers; we’ve included all of the technologies you might find in a centrally-managed UT classroom, from WolfVision Cynap to a document camera to interactive projectors. Enthusiastic OIT trainers will continue to lead your learning experience. 

 

Our new lab is conveniently located in the Communications Building and is the place where new ideas and new skills come to life for students, faculty, and staff.  

 

When registering for OIT face-2-face workshops, make a note of the new location. If you don’t see anything posted at your desired day or time, simply request group training from OIT or request a one-on-one consultation. 

 

We can’t wait to see you!


How to Spot an Email Scam: Tip 2

One way to spot an email scam is to check the sender's email address.  Official UTK communications is sent from a utk.edu address. However, be cautious; just because it is from a utk.edu address does not guarantee that it is legit.  If the email has other suspicious criteria, contact the OIT HelpDesk about the legitimacy of the message.

 

Learn more about how to spot an email scam on OIT’s website.


ePortfolios for Developing and Assessing Student Professional Competencies 

When: Thursday, October 18 from 1 to 3 p.m. in Communications, Room 43, Classroom C

Learn how ePortfolios can be used to assess and showcase student work, demonstrate competencies, assist students in job searches, and aid cross-discipline and departmental collaborations.
Register for the workshop and learn how to initiate an ePortfolio program for your students, course, department, project, or for yourself, and you'll have a chance to experiment with the Canvas ePortfolio tool and its features.


R & RStudio

R is a free, open -source software environment for statistical computing, data management, and graphics. While it includes a simple code editor, it can be controlled through many other packages. The most popular way to run R is through RStudio, a free and open source program which includes a code editor, as well as debugging and visualization tools. R is very extensible and supports a wide range of analytic and visualization methods. However, its data usually must fit into your computer’s main memory, limiting the size of data sets it can analyze.

 

Learn more about R and RStudio on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

OIT does not have any workshops scheduled for this week.  Check out the Online Calendar for all of our upcoming workshops.

 

Can't make it to class or want to learn about another topic? Check out our online training sessions.


Social Engineering is Spooky!

Social engineering is a psychological attack where an attacker tricks you into doing something you should not do. The concept of social engineering is not new; it has existed for thousands of years. Think of scammers or con artists, it is the very same idea. What makes today’s technology so much more effective for cyber attackers is you cannot physically see them; they can easily pretend to be anything or anyone they want and target millions of people around the world, including you. In addition, social engineering attacks can bypass many security technologies. The simplest way to understand how these attacks work and protect yourself from them is to take a look at two real-world examples.

 

You receive a phone call from someone claiming to be from a computer support company, the OIT HelpDesk, or even Microsoft Tech Support. The caller explains that your computer is actively scanning the Internet. They believe it is infected and have been tasked with helping you secure your computer. Once they have tricked you into believing your computer is infected, they pressure you into buying their security software or giving them remote access to your computer so they can fix it. However, the software they are selling is actually a malicious program. If you purchase and install it, not only have they fooled you into infecting your computer, but you just paid them to do it. If you give them remote access to your computer, they are going to take it over, steal your data, or use it for their bidding.

 

Keep in mind, social engineering attacks like these are not limited to phone calls or email; they can happen in any form, including text messages on your phone, over social media, or even in person. The key is to know what to look out for--you are your own best defense.

 

Stopping Social Engineering Attacks

  • Someone asking for information they should not have access to or should already know, such as your account numbers.
  • Someone asking for your password. No legitimate organization will ever ask you for that.
  • Someone pressuring you to bypass or ignore security processes or procedures you are expected to follow at work.
  • Something too good to be true. For example, you are notified you won the lottery or an iPad, even though you never even entered the lottery.
  • You receive an odd email from a friend or coworker containing wording that does not sound like it is really them. A cyber attacker may have hacked into their account and is attempting to trick you. To protect yourself, verify such requests by reaching out to your friend using a different communications method, such as in person or over the phone.
  • If you suspect someone is trying to trick or fool you, do not communicate with the person anymore. If the attack is work related, be sure to report it to your help desk or information security team right away. Remember, common sense is often your best defense.

 


Have questions or need assistance? Contact the HelpDesk.

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October 01
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 1, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

October 1, 2018

 

Looking for information about OIT Services?

Check out the OIT website!  The search box on our home page will search all of our services and the OIT Knowledge Base.  If you want to learn more about Canvas or our course design services, use the OIT search!  Do you want to learn about OIT’s website hosting services or looking for training? Use the search to find what you’re looking for quickly.

 

We also provide quick links on the right in the “I Want To” section.  These are our most popular pages, including Setting Up Your Email, Downloading Software, and Resetting Your NetID Password.

 

Can’t find what you are looking for?  Contact the OIT HelpDesk by phone at 865-974-9900, by chat, or online.


Are you traveling for Fall Break?

Do you have plans to visit other universities during Fall Break? If so, check to see if that university provides an Eduroam wireless network. Eduroam, short for education roaming, allows students, staff, and faculty from participating institutions to obtain secure Internet connectivity across campus and when visiting other participating institutions. Go to Eduroam for more information, including a list of participating institutions.

 

If you are traveling to a university that offers an Eduroam wireless network, you will need to make sure you have connected to the Eduroam wireless network at UT before connecting to the Eduroam network while traveling. Instructions for getting connected with Eduroam are available in the OIT Knowledge Base, or you may contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900 for assistance.


Lynda.com Helps Teach Accounting

Hear from University of Tennessee lecturer, A. Norman, on how she is using Lynda.com as supplemental content for her students as she shares personal tips and lessons learned. 

 

Watch the video on OIT’s YouTube channel or learn more about how you can use Lynda.com as part of your class on OIT’s website.


R & RStudio

R is a free, open-source software environment for statistical computing, data management, and graphics. While it includes a simple code editor, it can be controlled through many other packages. The most popular way to run R is through RStudio, a free and open source program which includes a code editor, as well as debugging and visualization tools. R is very extensible and supports a wide range of analytic and visualization methods. However, its data usually must fit into your computer’s main memory, limiting the size of data sets it can analyze.

 

Learn more about R and RStudio on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

Here's a selection of topics that will be covered in workshops this week:

 

·         Apple GarageBand

·         Introduction to HTML/CSS

·         Screen Casting for Teaching and Learning

 

View our calendar of upcoming workshops at workshops.utk.edu and register to attend.

 

Can't make it to class or want to learn about another topic? Check out our online training sessions.


Don't Let a Phishing Scam Reel You In

Cybercriminals use phishing—a type of social engineering—to manipulate people into doing what they want. Social engineering is at the heart of all phishing attacks, especially those conducted via e-mail. Technology makes phishing easy. Setting up and operating a phishing attack is fast, inexpensive, and low risk: any cybercriminal with an e-mail address can launch one.

 

According to Verizon's 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report, the education sector saw a rise in social engineering–based attacks. Students, staff, and faculty all suffered losses when personal data and research were disclosed to unauthorized parties. Phishing played a part in more than 40% of these breaches. Knowing what you're up against can help you be more secure.

 

Here are a few things you can do to guard against phishing attacks:

  • Limit what you share online. The less you share about yourself, the smaller the target you are for a phishing attack. Cybercriminals use information you post online to learn how to gain your trust.
  • Protect your credentials. No legitimate company or organization will ask for your username and password or other personal information via e-mail. Your school definitely won't. Still not sure if the e-mail is a phish? Contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.
  • Beware of attachments. E-mail attachments are the most common vector for malicious software. When you get a message with an attachment, delete it—unless you are expecting it and are absolutely certain it is legitimate.
  • Confirm identities. Phishing messages can look official. Cybercriminals steal organization and company identities, including logos and URLs that are close to the links they're trying to imitate. There's nothing to stop them from impersonating schools, financial institutions, retailers, and a wide range of other service providers.
  • Trust your instincts. If you get a suspicious message that claims to be from an agency or service provider, use your browser to manually locate the organization online and contact them via their website, e-mail, or telephone number.
  • Check the sender. Check the sender's e-mail address. Any correspondence from an organization should come from an organizational e-mail address. A notice from your college or university is unlikely to come from “ut-helpdesk@yahoo.com” or “helpdesk@ut-helpdesk.edu”.
  • Take your time. If a message states that you must act immediately or lose access, do not comply. Phishing attempts frequently threaten a loss of service unless you do something. Cybercriminals want you to react without thinking; an urgent call to action makes you more likely to cooperate.
  • Don't click links in suspicious messages. If you don't trust the e-mail (or text message), don't trust the links in it either. Beware of links that are hidden by URL shorteners or text like "Click Here." They may link to a phishing site or a form designed to steal your username and password.

 


Have questions or need assistance? Contact the HelpDesk.

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September 25
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, September 25, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

September 24, 2018

 

You asked, and we listened: 

OIT Upgrades Internet Capacity

In response to comments we received in the annual survey, OIT made several changes over the summer to improve the campus Internet connectivity and increase bandwidth when accessing resources outside of UT.  Affected services include Office 365, Google, Netflix, HBO Go, Amazon, and much more!

 

We increased the total bandwidth to the internet from 4 GB to 10 GB; for redundancy, we have two providers supplying us with 5 GB each.  We have also installed a caching server that stores popular content in our data center so that it can be delivered to your device more quickly while offloading traffic from our Internet circuits.

 

Happy Surfing!


Getting Ready for Midterms and looking for a quick way to score your exams?

Join your colleagues in using Akindi to score your Scantron-like exams.

 

To use it, you or your students print forms on a standard printer, then batch scan the completed forms on your departmental copier/scanner and upload the file to Akindi for scoring. The grades will go straight into Canvas. 

 

  • Use Any Time: score your exams 24/7.
  • Change Your Key: with a few clicks, no need to re-scan! 
  • Save Your Department Money: your department no longer has to pay for Scantron services.
  • Save Your Students Money: students no longer need to pay for scantron forms.

 

Learn more about Akindi and watch our short video on the OIT website.


See OIT’s New Training Space for This Week’s IT Community of Practice (ITCoP)

On Wednesday, September 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., OIT will have an Open House celebrating our new training space in Communications, room 43, Classroom C. During the ITCoP meeting portion of the Open House, from 12:20 to 1:10 p.m.  OIT staff will showcase the technology in the new classroom. This technology includes what you can find in classrooms around campus. Get ideas for using Cynap, interactive projector, document camera, and clickers.

 

Come early and stay for the ITCoP meeting to get to know OIT staff, hear about all our services for instructors, and enjoy games, food, and prizes.

 

This semester and next semester, the ITCoP meetings, which normally take place on the fourth Wednesday of each month from 12:20 to 1:10 p.m. in Hodges Library 220E will be roving campus to see all the great teaching and learning spaces using technology. See maker spaces, 3D printing, and more when you join us.


Interested in Machine Learning and Text Analysis?

The Business Analytics and Statistics Department is hosting a free workshop on how to use the point-and-click, code-free, open-source KNIME software to do machine learning and text analysis. The workshop will take place on October 12, 2018, in Haslam Business Building Room 201.

Learn more about this opportunity and register online.


QuestionPro, by QuestionPro Inc.

QuestionPro, a powerful online survey research tool available to all faculty, staff, and students at all UT campuses. Using QuestionPro, you can design simple to complex surveys in a web browser, distribute the survey, run frequencies as it continues to collect data, and then download your data. For in-depth analysis, you can export your data to an SPSS, CSV, or Excel file.

 

Learn more about Question Pro on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

Here's a selection of topics that will be covered in workshops this week:

 

  • Arc
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Office 365: OneNote
  • R for Machine Learning
  • Using Student Digital Devices for Active Learning

 

View our calendar of upcoming workshops at workshops.utk.edu and register to attend.

 

Can't make it to class or want to learn about another topic? Check out our online training sessions.


Downloading: Think Twice

Computer and smartphone users must manage a plethora of updates and downloads to keep their software and applications up-to-date and running. We have become so accustomed to these necessary updates that we quickly scroll through the end-user license agreement (EULA) clicking “agree” before reading any fine print, often without any noticeable problems. However, as this has become more common, so have the frequency of potentially unwanted programs, or “PUPs”.

 

These programs are often spyware or adware applications that are installed along with the desired application that you agreed to download. This might leave you asking: “How did I download unwanted spyware or adware that I didn’t agree to?” Therein lies the trick, you did agree to the download. That end user license agreement that you scrolled through so quickly, those agreements will contain information about PUPs and inform the users that the additional program will be installed with their desired program.

 

What are the downsides to having PUPs on your computer or device? They may contain built-in keyloggers that record your keystrokes or monitor your browser activities putting your sensitive data at risk. Furthermore, they are often hard to remove from your device, and they can have long-term effects even after removal hindering your productivity.

 

What can you do about PUPs? Below are a few tips to help you avoid being infected by PUPs.

  • Make SURE it’s really an update or installation from a trusted source. If you get an alert that your Adobe Flash program is out of date, go to adobe.com and verify it yourself.
  • Read the end user license agreements before agreeing to the terms. Free does not always mean free. Being familiar with the terms and conditions associated with your download can help you avoid downloading unwanted PUPs.
  • Always choose the custom or advanced installation and never accept the express or standard install.
  • When downloading from a portal, always use the actual download and stay away from oversized flashing download buttons.
  • Make sure you have antivirus and anti-malware software and keep your system, software, and devices up-to-date.

 


Have questions or need assistance? Contact the HelpDesk.

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September 10
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, September 10, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

September 10, 2018

 

 

Campus-Wide Phishing Scam

 

 

Did you receive an email last week asking you to “Click to view the full message” or similar request?  The scammers upped their game by sending a new type of phishing scam that appeared to reply to emails in the compromised mailbox, increasing the appearance of being legitimate.

 

The email administration team is taking steps to eradicate this particular scam. However, if you were the recipient of one of these messages and believe your account has been compromised, you should change your NetID password immediately and scan your computer for malware and viruses.

 

Remember: Do not click on links or call phone numbers provided in email messages.  Instead, look up the website and contact information on the university (or company) page.

 

To brush up on your anti-phishing skills, check out OIT’s Phishing website which includes information on how to spot a phishing scam and what to do when you receive one.

 

As a reminder, OIT will post email scams to the Recent Email Scams tab within the OIT System Status Center.  You can check this site to see if a suspicious email has already been reported.  If you have concerns about a specific email, you may report the email to OIT via abuse@utk.edu or by contacting the OIT HelpDesk.


Student Digital Devices in the Classroom

Part 1: Managing Digital Distractions in the Classroom - Tue, Sept 18, 2:15-4:15

Part 2: Using Student Digital Devices for Active Learning - Tue, Sept 25, 2:15-4:15.

 

Have you considered mobile options for student learning in the classroom? All students can now respond to instructor questions with their own digital devices (laptops, smartphones, and tablets). Various free apps, such as Canvas Student and Google Drive can also be used for in-class learning activities.

 

Managing Digital Distractions offers practical tips on how to manage student device use in your classroom, while Using Student Digital Devices for Active Learning introduces instructional strategies and techniques for creating learning interactions, collaboration, and on-the-fly assessments enabled with student devices.

 

If you need assistance registering for these classes, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.


Students: Come to the LinkedIn Clinic

The LinkedIn Clinic is just around the corner. Join us during this two-day event. Come dressed to get a professional photo taken by OIT and then get a LinkedIn consultation on how to network and job search. Come on Sept. 19 at 2:30 p.m. for a Web Development Overview and then stay for a portfolio or webpage consultation. Finally, you can get a résumé consultation from the Center for Career Development and get information from UT Libraries to help make online job searches easier.

 

When: Wednesday and Thursday, September 19 and 20, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Where: Hodges Library, Commons North


Connected accounts in Outlook on the web is being retired

This September, Microsoft is removing the ability to add new accounts using the “Connected accounts” functionality in Outlook on the web. For a similar experience, Microsoft recommends to instead set up forwarding rules from your connected email accounts or download Outlook for iOS or Outlook for Android. The Outlook mobile apps sync email, calendar, and contacts from many non-Microsoft email providers.

 

Microsoft’s timeline is as follows:

  • Starting September 15, 2018, users will no longer be able to add new accounts through the “Connected accounts” feature in Outlook on the web. Accounts that were connected before September 15th will continue to sync new email until October 30, 2018.
  • On October 30, 2018, all “Connected accounts” will stop syncing email.
  • On November 15, 2018, Microsoft will remove the “Connected accounts” option from Outlook on the web (Settings -> Mail -> Accounts). Email that has already synced will continue to appear in your inbox unless you remove it.

QDA Miner by Provalis Research, Inc.

QDA Miner is a software package which aids in the qualitative analysis of text or images. In addition to purely qualitative functions like creating and applying coding structures, QDA Miner also provides more numerical functions such as analysis of coding co-occurrences and analyzing coding by other variables such as age or gender.

 

Learn more about QDA Miner on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

OIT will be offering workings for the following topics this week.  Check out the Online Calendar to see the schedule and register for any OIT workshop.

 

·         Adobe Photoshop

·         Arc

·         Best Practices for Presentations

·         JMP

·         Lynda.com

·         Microsoft Excel

·         NVivo

·         Question Pro

·         SAS

·         Word Formatting for Resumes

 

In addition to workshops, OIT offers several online training offerings (including Lynda.com).  If you have questions about training, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.


Reminder: 2018 Security Awareness Training

The 2018 Security Awareness training assignments have been sent to UTK and UTSI Faculty and Staff and must be completed by November 30, 2018 (unless directed by your department to complete it sooner).  This training is required annually through UT Policy IT0123 - Security Awareness, Training, and Education.   

 

The IT Security Awareness training is created by SANS, one of the most trusted source for information security training, certification, and research in the world. The training consists of a number of videos that cover specific security topics. The videos range anywhere from 1 to 5 minutes in length and are intended to raise awareness and influence user behavior that will reduce security risks. The training allows the users to complete the training at their own pace, monitor their progress, and revisit completed training.

 

Learn more about the 2018 Security Awareness Training.

 

If you have completed cybersecurity training through your partnership with another institution, you can request this training fulfill the Mandatory Training Requirement for 2018.  To submit this request, log in to K@Te and select ‘Home’ from the left menu.  Choose ‘Universal Profile’ and select the ‘Transcripts’ tab.  Choose the three dots (…) on the right and select ‘Add External Training’ and follow the instructions.

 

For assistance signing in and completing the training, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.


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September 04
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, September 4, 2018

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

September 4, 2018

 

Instructors: Do you need an HDMI adapter?

Are you teaching in a technology-enhanced classroom and find yourself in need of an HDMI adapter?  If so, OIT can help!  Based on feedback from the annual survey, OIT will provide instructors with a single adapter for your primary teaching device so you can connect your laptop or tablet to the technology in the classroom.  If you have an HDMI port on your computer, you should be good to go. 

 

OIT is only able to provide one adapter per person.  If you change computers and have already received an adapter, we will not be able to provide a replacement. 

 

Faculty and Instructors: Sign up online to request your adapter.

GTAs: Contact the OIT HelpDesk to make your request.

 

If you have any questions or need assistance with the request, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.


Report Wireless Problems in your Classroom

Did you know that the Office of Information Technology offers a service to report classroom wireless issues via text message? To report areas on campus where there may be issues with the wireless network, text “UTKwifi” followed by your building and room number information to 55000. 

 

This initiative allows OIT to collect crowdsourced data provided by you, the students, staff, and faculty that are in the classrooms using the Wi-Fi every day. It is recommended to check that your device has been registered for use on the wireless network and was working normally in other areas of campus before texting in your location. Your input will help ensure that we have the most accurate data possible. As an added benefit of this service, if we receive several text messages in a short time frame for a specific area (for example an academic classroom in Alumni Memorial Building), OIT will investigate the issue and dispatch network engineers if necessary. This information, including a screenshot example of how to text in your location, is available in the OIT Knowledge Base. If you have any questions, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900. 


Introduction to Arc

By popular request, we have scheduled additional workshops to be delivered via Zoom in the coming weeks. Register online to reserve your spot!

 

·       Friday, 9/7/18: 10:00 am – 11:30 am and 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

·       Monday, 9/10/18: 11:30 am – 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

·       Tuesday, 9/18/18: 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

 

Arc is an interactive audio/video platform from the makers of Canvas. It allows students and instructors to upload audios/videos to Canvas. Users can then engage with the video content by commenting directly on the media timeline. Watch a preview and learn more about Arc on OIT’s website.


Office 365: Bill payment events in Outlook

Have you recently noticed calendar events or email reminders showing up with information from your recently booked travel, reservations, or bills? Microsoft is rolling out a new feature for Outlook that automatically retrieves important events from your email for supported senders and adds the items to your calendar, so you don't have to. Outlook will create events from an email that contains the following information: flights, hotel reservations, car rentals, package delivery, dining reservations, events - music, sports, or others, and bills. Outlook uses machine-learning algorithms to find upcoming bills and does not have access to your financial information or track your financial activity to find these events. You can turn events from email on or off and choose which information is added automatically through Outlook on the web and selecting the Settings button, then Calendar, then Events from email on the left.  Learn more about this feature on Microsoft’s website.


NVivo by QSR International

NVivo is a qualitative analysis software package that supports both qualitative and mixed methods research. It lets you collect, organize, and analyze content from interviews, focus groups, discussions, surveys, documents, audio and visual files, images, social media data, web pages, and spreadsheets. It also offers multiple ways to visualize and report data, including graphs, charts and cluster analysis. Within the program, one can search all or part of the data, sort data based on variable attributes or classifications, and display a matrix of codes or coding structures. Video and Audio files can be transcribed and analyzed within the program. It also interfaces with EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero for conducting a paperless literature review.

 

Learn more about NVivo on OIT’s Research Software website.  Learn when to use it, where to run it, how to learn, and where to get help.


Upcoming OIT Workshops

OIT will be offering workings for the following topics this week.  Check out the Online Calendar to see the schedule and register for any OIT workshop.

 

·       Adobe Photoshop 1 (Selections and Manipulations)

·       Adobe Photoshop 2 (Layers, Frames, and Edges)

·       Enhance Accessibility & Productivity with Read & Write Software

·       R Basics

 

If you are unable to attend these sessions or want to learn more about these topics, check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

If you have questions about training, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.


Protecting Data on Your Smartphone

When we store personal information on devices like smartphones, we are taking the risk that the information will be exposed to unauthorized persons. Here are some recommendations:

 

·       Avoid storing pictures locally on your laptop, smartphone or tablet.

 

·       Keep secure backups on Hard Disk Drives or other less portable devices to securely store your confidential and sensitive documents. Make sure that the hard drive is kept well away from an internet connection, as any internet-connected device can be an open door for hackers at some point.

 

·       Encrypt, encrypt, encrypt. It may seem an overhyped functionality, but making your data undecipherable to hackers is a strong defense. Latest generation Android devices have an embedded full-device encryption feature that can encrypt all data, including applications, downloaded files, and pictures. If your phone has PIN capabilities, SET IT! This will enable encryption.

 

·       Protect your accounts with strong, complex passwords. Use symbols, numbers, and capital letters or even strange phrases to lock your cloud content from prying eyes.

 

·       Try to blur out your face on potentially compromising images. You wouldn’t want your risqué selfies to appear on Twitter, Reddit or Facebook would you?

 

·       Don’t email your private photos. Email accounts, especially those without two-factor authentication enabled, are easy targets for hackers looking to steal your personal details and intimate photos.

 

·       Format your memory card or internal memory. When you sell or lend your phone, be sure to format and overwrite the data with a secure erase tool to make sure that nothing remains.

 

·       Don’t share confidential information on open Wi-Fi hotspots unless you use a proper mobile security solution to block unrequested connections. Hackers can monitor your traffic and grab your banking credentials and compromising pictures without your knowledge. NOTE: UT-Open and is an open hotspot, meaning the data is NOT encrypted between your device and the access point. Eduroam offers the only encrypted service between your device and the network on campus. You can authenticate to Eduroam using your UT email address (netid@utk.edu or netid@vols.utk.edu) and password credentials.

 

·       Disable auto-uploads for cloud storage solutions such as Google Apps, iCloud and Dropbox. These services, as useful as they may seem, create cloud-based versions of your images without filtering your most sensitive files from the harmless ones.


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