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The IT Weekly Archive for the Office of Information Technology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
April 21
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, April 21, 2017

 

April 21, 2017

 

Coming in May: New OIT Website

You asked, and we listened! The UT campus has shared website suggestions with us through surveys, online requests, and feedback sessions. In response, OIT’s new site will feature a simplified layout, fewer pages to sort through, and an all-new search box designed to cut through the clutter. Our site-wide upgrade will also include a major boost for accessibility and mobile-friendliness. Visit oit.utk.edu in mid-May for a link to a sneak peek, or come back in late May to check out the live site!

 

Do You Eduroam During the Summer?

Do you travel to other universities during the summer months? If so, check to see if that university provides an Eduroam wireless network. Eduroam, short for education roaming, is the secure, world-wide roaming access service developed for the international research and education community. Eduroam allows students, staff, and faculty from participating institutions to obtain Internet connectivity across campus and when visiting other participating institutions. Go to Eduroam for more information, including a list of participating institutions.

 

If you are traveling to a university that offers an Eduroam wireless network, you will need to make sure you have connected to the Eduroam wireless network at your home institution before connecting to the Eduroam network at your destination institution. Instructions for getting connected with Eduroam are available in the OIT Knowledge Base, or you may contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900 for assistance. 

 

Instructional Technologies Community of Practice:
Hear from Faculty Who Have Transitioned to Canvas

Are you seeking an effective transition from Blackboard to Canvas?  Join us Wednesday, April 26, from 12:20 to 1:10 p.m. in the Hodges Library Practice Presentation Room 220E. Bring your lunch and a colleague to hear UTK faculty share insights and experiences for effectively transitioning your course to Canvas at the IT Community of Practice meeting.

 

Lisa Yamagata-Lynch and OIT staff will be hosting our last IT Community of Practice meeting of the semester.  We hope to see you there!

 

Reminder: Clicker Training on April 26-27

Turning Technologies will be leading workshops to train instructors on incorporating and using clickers in the classroom on April 26-27. Bring your questions and learn about the new features available to you. 

Sign up on our website for one of the workshops happening throughout each day.

 

 

 

 

ArcGIS from Esri 

What is it? ArcGIS is an integrated suite of software products for work with maps and geographic information. In addition to creating maps, it can be used to compile and analyze geographic data and manage geographic databases, as well as many other applications. It also provides a platform for making maps and geographic information accessible openly on the Web for an organization or a user community. Most ArcGIS features can be controlled by menus, but programming using ArcGIS’ ModelBuilder or scripting using other languages such as Python and JavaScript provide advanced functionality.

 

Where can I run it? For UTK, ArcGIS products are available on Windows machines in most OIT Computer Labs. Faculty and staff can download the software for no additional cost from the OIT software distribution site and install it on UT owned machines. Compatible operating systems include Windows, Windows Server, and Linux Servers. Students can get information about obtaining a free, student version for one year by calling the OIT Help Desk at 865-974-9900.

 

How can I learn it? To get started with ArcGIS, you can enroll in free virtual training classes through the ESRI Virtual Campus. Course listings and enrollment information are available at UT Libraries’ Geographic Information Services website. Extensive online help is available from Esri, including the ArcGIS Help web page. The Lynda.com online training library offers free ArcGIS training videos to registered members. For information, visit  http://oit.utk.edu/lynda.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Minimal Support for ArcGIS. Visit OIT's ESRI page for more information. Assistance is also available through the UT Libraries’ Geographic Information Services website. For licensing information, call the OIT Help Desk at 865-974-9900.

 

Workshops for April 24-28, 2017

Instructor-Focused:

Adobe Muse (Basics), April 25, 12:40 pm – 2:40 pm

Turning Point Cloud Basics, April 26, 8:30a m – 10 am

Getting to Know Canvas, April 26, 9 am – 11 am

Turning Point Cloud Basics, April 26, 8:30 am – 10 am

Turning Point Cloud Basics, April 26, 10:30 am – 12 pm

Turning Point Cloud Basics, April 26, 1:30 pm – 3 pm

Turning Point Cloud Basics, April 27, 9 am – 10:30 am

Turning Point Cloud Basics, April 27, 10:30 am – 12 pm

Turning Point Cloud Basics, April 27, 1 pm – 2:30 pm

 

Researcher-Focused:

High Performance Computing (Newton HPC), April 28, 8 am (self-direct online workshop)

Linux Command-Line Skills, April 28, 8 am (self-direct online workshop)

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.

 

What is Social Engineering?

Social engineering is the art of manipulating people, so they give up confidential information. The types of information these criminals are seeking can vary, but when individuals are targeted the criminals are usually trying to trick you into giving them your passwords, bank information, your credit card information, or access your computer to secretly install malicious software–that will give them access to your information as well as give them control over your computer.

 

Criminals use social engineering tactics because it is usually easier to exploit your natural inclination to trust than it is to discover ways to hack your software.  For example, it is much easier to fool someone into giving you their password than it is for you to try hacking their password (unless the password is really weak).

 

Security is all about context; knowing WHO and WHAT to trust. Knowing when, and when not to take a person at their word; when to trust that the person you are communicating with is indeed the person you think you are communicating with; when to trust that a website is or isn’t

legitimate; when to trust that the person on the phone is or isn’t legitimate; when providing your information is or isn’t a good idea.

 

Ask any security professional and they will tell you that the weakest link in the security chain is YOU; the human who accepts a person or scenario at face value. It doesn’t matter how many locks and deadbolts are on your doors and windows, or if have guard dogs, alarm systems,

floodlights, fences with barbed wire, and armed security personnel; if you trust the person at the gate who says he is the pizza delivery guy and you let him in without first checking to see if he is legitimate you are completely exposed to whatever risk he represents.

 

For example, if you have a question about a charge on your credit card bill, call your bank or financial institution. Recently, there was a case where a person questioned an excessive charge on their credit card statement. They “Google’d” the customer service for the company placing

the charge and, innocently enough, went to a site that “looked about right” and had all the right words; except the URL did not belong to the company who had placed the charge. They called the number on the site and ended up giving their credit card to the person on the phone and

granting access to their work computer. It was a bogus site which mimics the customer service for all of the major social media outlets. For over 20-minutes, the criminals had access to the workstation PLUS the credit card number. Moreover, the criminals had full access to the person's email and drives. They were free to download as much from the workstation as they wanted.

 

NEVER grant others access to your computer (work or home) unless you have checked it out thoroughly. Ask your departmental IT staff before granting anyone access to your computer. You can also call OIT and seek guidance.

 

Regardless of our occupations or the level of education we’ve achieved, we’re all subject to social engineering; it’s how we’re built. Unfortunately, it’s exactly what the criminals are counting on, and they’re very good at extracting information from you. YOU are the last line of defense. All of the technical controls are moot if you give up control of your device or use passwords that are weak and subject to cracking.

 

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April 13
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, April 13, 2017

 

April 13, 2017

 

Mark Your Calendars!

Join us on Wednesday, April 19 from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM for the Greve Hall Open House and get to know the helpful departments of Greve Hall.  When you visit four or more information stations, you will be entered to win one of three UT swag bags.

 

OIT will be showcasing Canvas and Zoom in addition to Instructional Design, Training, Research Support, Desktop Support and the HelpDesk.  Come and learn about all the ways that OIT can assist you in the classroom and at work.  

 

Visit the First-Year Studies website for more information about the Open House.

 

OIT HelpDesk Closed for the Spring Recess

The OIT HelpDesk phone lines and walk-in service will be closed on Friday, April 14, and Sunday, April 16th for the Spring Recess Holidays. The HelpDesk phone lines will be open on Saturday, April 15, from 12:00 AM until 11:59 PM, closed on Sunday, April 16, and will reopen on Monday, April 17 at 12:00 AM. While the university is closed, OIT will continue to monitor the network, email, and major computer applications. To check the current status of IT systems, please visit the online IT System Status Center at http://help.utk.edu/status.

 

Canvas is here! Are you ready?

OIT is offering weekly Virtual Canvas Camps to help you become Canvas Ready before Blackboard retires on May 31, 2017.

 

Join us Mon/Wed/Fri from 9 am-noon and Tue/Thu from 1 pm-4 pm via Zoom, http://tiny.utk.edu/canvas-zoom

 

 

WordStat by Provalis Research, Inc.

What is it? WordStat is a supplemental program that works with either QDA Miner or Stata to perform content analysis on text data. This process is also known as text mining. You may create your own categorization dictionaries within WordStat or import pre-existing subject dictionaries. WordStat provides many of the same types of analyses as QDA Miner such as co-occurrence analysis and analyzing text categories by other variables such as age or gender. WordStat can only be started from within QDA Miner or Stata.

 

Where can I run it? WordStat is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs and Macs. The download and installation instructions are available at the OIT Software Download web page. It is also available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and the computers in the OIT public computer labs. There is no simultaneous user limit for WordStat.

 

How can I learn it? OIT offers workshops on WordStat each semester, and you can schedule a one-on-one tutorial by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900. Tutorials are also available online at the company's web page for tutorials.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for this software. For assistance, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 974-9900.

 

Workshops for April 17-21, 2017

Instructor-Focused:

Getting to Know Canvas, April 17, 2 pm – 4 pm

Mobile Learning In and Out of Class, April 19, 10 am – 12 pm

Getting to Know Canvas, April 21, 10 am – 12 pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.

 

Computer Security Update: Avoiding Computer Infections

Approximately 1,000,000 emails are received per day, destined for utk.edu email boxes, are examined by Microsoft. 90% of it is SPAM, but sometimes SPAM or unsolicited email gets past the filters and show up in the 10% that make it to your Inbox.

 

It’s a good idea to assume that unsolicited email attachments and links to websites are infectious. There are so many of these in circulation that it’s safest to assume the worst. Random strangers, friends, and family members who probably don’t know that they’re infected may send

infected email attachments and links to infectious websites to you. Messages from colleagues are probably safe but even they may be infected, so take care. Emails from free webmail services such as Yahoo! and Gmail that only include a link, perhaps with a short message along the lines of “This is great! Check it out,” are almost always bad news.

 

If you receive unsolicited email or email that is clearly phishing email. Forward the message with full headers to abuse@utk.edu. To get the full headers, please see the Knowledge Base articles for Outlook for Windows and Outlook for Mac or contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 

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April 07
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, April 7, 2017

 

April 7, 2017

 

New Online Directory

On Monday, April 10th, OIT will launch the new the online directory at the same address as the current page, directory.utk.edu. Not only will the website have a new look and feel, but it will meet current accessibility standards. You will continue to be able to find contact information for UT faculty, staff, and students on the new site.
 
Did you know?
When you use the directory while on campus, you can see additional information like class, curriculum, affiliation, and title. Need to see this info from home? Just log in.

 

Windows 10 Creators Build Coming soon

On April 11, Microsoft is releasing a major update to Windows 10, the Creators Build, which will be installed on your computer over the next two to three months.  This update is much larger than the standard updates, similar to the Service Packs of earlier versions of Windows.  You should expect minor changes in the appearance of Windows once the update has been installed, however, this update should have no effect on any programs or files stored on your computer.

 

Windows 10 Creator Build includes updates to Microsoft Edge, the Start Experience, Cortana, accessibility, Windows Defender, Settings, and more.  These changes include minor changes to the appearance, action center task pane, and security center.  Many of the changes will not be readily apparent while you are using your computer.  Check out Microsoft’s Blog for a complete list of updates.

 

We have only been able to perform limited testing so far with this release, but we do not anticipate any major problems. This release is an automatic update, to be scheduled by Microsoft. If you need assistance or encounter any issues during the update, please contact OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900 and ask for Desktop Support to arrange an appointment.

 

Stata MP by Stata Corp

What is it? Stata MP is a general purpose package for statistics, data management, and graphics. You can control it using its programming language or its graphical user interface. Stata is designed to be easily extendable, and there are many hundreds of free add-ons available for it in Internet repositories. Stata is particularly strong in time series, panel data, and the analysis of complex, non-random samples. Its data must fit into your computer’s main memory, limiting the amount of data it can handle.

 

Where can I run it? Stata MP is available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and the computers in the OIT public computer labs. There is a 14 simultaneous user limit for Stata MP.

 

How can I learn it? To get started with Stata, you can watch the tutorials on the company's YouTube training channel.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Minimal Support for Stata. However, there is a very active and helpful support group named StataList.

 

Anything else I should know? You can purchase Stata for your computer directly from the company. UT has "GradPlan" educational pricing. Don Bruce in CBER is the campus representative. Feel free to contact him with your questions at dbruce@utk.edu or 865-974-6088. 

 

Workshops for April 10-14, 2017

Instructor-Focused:

Getting to Know Canvas, April 12, 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Cloud Storage Options at UTK, April 13, 9 am – 11 am

iPads and Instruction, April 13, 1 pm – 3 pm

 

Student-Focused:

Social Media, LinkedIn and Your Resume, April 10, 11:15 am - 12:05 pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.

 

Securing Internet of Things (IoT)

Internet of Things (IoT) is defined as a system of interrelated computing devices and objects that can transfer data over a network without the need of any human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction. In 2013, the Global Standards Initiative defined IoT as “the infrastructure of the information society.” Examples of devices or “things” in IoT can refer to a variety of devices such as smart TV’s, routers, smart thermostats and smart home devices.

 

The first step in protecting your IoT device is to consider what functionality you need from the device. Just because your refrigerator or washer and dryer can connect to the internet doesn’t mean you should connect it to the internet. Be sure you fully understand what internet connectivity will mean for your IoT device and decide whether that benefit is valuable. If you ultimately choose to hook up your IOT devices to the internet, create a separate network for guests that do not allow access to your shared files or networking devices.

 

Also, be aware that many IoT devices come equipped with very few security features, little security support, and a default password that is rarely changed. Consequently, these devices can be hacked, making it possible to slow your Internet and attack other devices.  Therefore, when purchasing and using IoT devices, be sure to change the default password that comes preloaded on the device.

 

Finally, be sure to update your device when new software becomes available. Vulnerabilities and exploits are usually fixed as they emerge, so it is important that your IoT devices are regularly updated. If possible, automate this on your IoT device or check for updates as frequently as possible.

 

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March 31
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, March 31, 2017

 

March 31, 2017

 

Network Snapshot

Have you ever wondered just how big our internet connection is?  Our faculty, staff, and students spend a lot of time online.  Here is a breakdown of what our usage looked like last week!

 

  • We downloaded over 437 TB of data and uploaded almost 100 TB!  To put this in perspective, 1 TB is 17,000 songs, 310,000 photos, or 500 hours of movies.
  • Streaming video and audio accounted for more than 35% of the download traffic - with Netflix leading the way at 25%.
  • Web traffic follows at 32%.
  • On-line gaming represents about 5% of the utilization.

 

We have network access in over 160 buildings on campus.  The Knoxville campus has more than 100 Gigabits per second (Gbps) connectivity to the Internet and Internet2 to support our usage.  Thirty percent of our buildings have 20 Gbps high-speed network connections on campus to support research and big data projects.

 

Wireless devices were responsible for 88% of the downloads during the week. At the busiest time of day, around 30,000 wireless devices connect to the network. Over the course of the week, the network saw over 85,000 unique wireless devices. To support your wireless usage, OIT has deployed over 5,100 access points across campus.

 

Mark Your Calendar:

Clicker Training - Learn to Engage, Monitor, Measure

On April 26 and 27, Turning Technologies will be leading workshops to train instructors on incorporating and using clickers in the classroom. Come with questions and learn about the new features available to you. 

Sign up on our website for one of the workshops happening throughout each day.

 

Pinnacle Upgrade Complete!

OIT has completed the upgrade and migration of the Pinnacle application to an off-campus, hosted environment. The Pinnacle system is used by OIT for inventory management, tracking voice and data circuits, and billing. The move to the hosted environment eliminates the need for in-house technical staff to manage upgrades, security patching, hardware, virtual machines, and databases required for this application.  To access your department’s bill, a direct link to Pinnacle is available on the OIT website.

 

SPSS Statistics by SPSS, an IBM company

What is itSPSS Statistics is the most widely used statistics package at UT. It does a broad range of statistics and graphics, and it is easy to learn and use. It is also easy to transfer data from SPSS into R or SAS to access any esoteric analyses. While most users prefer the SPSS easy-to-use GUI interface, more advanced users can take advantage of its programming language. The SPSS programming language can be used to automate repetitive tasks, to leave an audit trail of the steps you took, and to get the package to do something that it was not originally designed to do.

 

Where can I run it? SPSS is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows, Macs and Linux computers. The download and installation instructions are available at the OIT Software Download web page. It is also available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and the computers in the OIT public computer labs. There is no simultaneous user limit for SPSS.

 

How can I learn it? OIT offers workshops on SPSS each semester, and you may schedule a one-on-one tutorial by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900. There is also an introductory tutorial available in SPSS under Help. The other help files are easy to learn from and very detailed. The Lynda.com online training library offers free SPSS training videos to registered members.​​

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for SPSS. You can request assistance by contacting the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 

Workshops for April 3-7, 2017

Instructor-Focused:

Getting to Know Canvas, April 4, 9:30 am – 11:30 am

Creating Accessible Documents with Adobe Acrobat DC, April 5, 9 am – 11 am

Prezi Tips for Conferences, April 6, 3:30 pm – 5 pm

Camtasia for Windows 1-Creating Online Instructional Video on Windows PC, April 7, 1 pm – 3 pm

 

Researcher-Focused:

Introduction to MATLAB, April 7, 3:30 pm – 5 pm

 

Student-Focused:

Microsoft Excel 3-Advanced Features, April 4, 9:40 am – 11:40 am

Office 365 Special Topics, April 5, 1:30pm – 3:30pm

Making Posters with Adobe Illustrator, April 6, 12:40 pm – 2:40 pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.

 

Computer Security: Backup and Recovery

Taking proper precautions to protect your computer greatly diminishes the risk of your data from being hacked. However, nothing eliminates all risk. Aside from the fact that you could have your computer stolen or experience hardware failure, cyber criminals are constantly thinking of ways to gain access to your information. In the unfortunate event that any of these things happen, it’s imperative that you consistently backup any computer system where you store data.

 

A backup is simply a copy of your information stored elsewhere. There are a couple of options of how you can back up your data.  The first option is physical media. Examples of physical media are DVD’s, USB drives or other external hard drives. The next option is to backup your data to the cloud. Cloud-based solutions store your information somewhere on the Internet. One advantage of cloud-based options is that it eliminates any physical to access your data through physical media and removes any concern if a physical media device is stolen or misplaced. Cloud-based media also allows for access to your data as long as you can access the Internet.

 

The recovery aspect of ‘Backup and Recovery” is just as important as the backup stage. You must be able to recover your data to gain access to your information. Make it a habit to check once a month to confirm your backups are working by recovering a file and validating its contents.

 

Tips Moving Forward

 

·        If you must rebuild a system from backup, apply the latest security patches before using the system again.

·        If you backup your data using physical media keep those devices in a safe place.

·        If you choose to use a cloud solution, be sure the provider has a good reputation and meets your requirements.

·        If you need to back up a departmental server, contact the OIT HelpDesk at (865) 974-9900 for information on Backup and Recovery options.

 

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March 24
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, March 24, 2017

 

March 22, 2017

 

OIT Faculty Fellow Call for Proposals:

Collaborate with Our Team

Deadline to apply is May 1, 2017

The OIT Faculty Fellow Program assists in advancing exemplary teaching and enriching the experience of students by implementing projects that enhance their department's use of instructional technologies. Faculty Fellows also promote the services available through OIT. Fellows are appointed each academic year pending budget approval. For more information, see the Faculty Fellow Responsibilities and Application Process on the OIT website.

The current Faculty Fellows are Lisa Yamagata-Lynch, Associate Professor in the Educational Psychology & Counseling Department and Robert Spirko, Senior Lecturer in the Department of English. During their time as Faculty Fellows, they have participated in several panel discussions on incorporating accessibility into instruction, assignments and the Canvas learning management system.

 

Update: Classification Survey

 

The Classification Survey initiative continues as we ask faculty, staff, and student employees using university computing equipment to complete a brief survey identifying the type of data stored, viewed, or processed on their university-owned equipment. 

 

Based on feedback that we received from you, we have made several changes to the emails and the website.  We now include a Knowledge Base link to the instructions for classification in the daily classification notice.  Additionally, when there are five days remaining to classify the device, we will start notifying the owner that the device needs to be classified.   For any device with an assigned IP address, such as a printer or server, we will send out separate notification emails to indicate that these critical devices are due for classification.

 

Since January 23, 7,700 university-owned devices have been classified; approximately 26,000 university-owned devices remain on the classification list.  If you have any questions or need assistance, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.

 

SigmaPlot by Systat Software, Inc.

What is it? SigmaPlot is a scientific graphing and visualization software package with advanced curve fitting, a vector-based programming language, and macro capability. The software is controlled through the graphical user interface that is modeled after the Microsoft Office style ribbon system. SigmaPlot contains over 100 graph types, and the user interface allows detailed manipulation of every graph object. SigmaPlot also includes access to 50 statistical tests which can be used for basic data analysis.

Where can I run it? SigmaPlot is available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and on the computers in the OIT public computer labs, where six people can use it at once.

How can I learn it? To get started with SigmaPlot you can watch the tutorials on the SigmaPlot introductory movies web page.

Where can I get support? OIT offers Minimal Support for SigmaPlot. However, the company offers assistance through their product support page.

 

Workshops for March 20 - 24, 2017

Instructor-Focused:

BYOD with WolfVision Cynap, March 28, 9:30 am – 11 am

Getting to know Canvas, March 31, 9 am – 11 am

Prezi Tips for Conferences, March 31, 9 am – 10:30 am

Adobe Captivate Interactive Practice and Assessment Templates, March 31, 1 pm – 3 pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.

 

Don’t Be Fooled, Protect Your Identity

EDUCAUSE research shows that 21 percent of respondents to the annual ECAR student study have had an on-line account hacked, and 14 percent have had a computer, tablet, or smart phone stolen. On-line fraud is an ongoing risk. The following tips can help you prevent identity theft.

 

·        Read your credit card, bank, and pay statements carefully each month. Look for unusual or unexpected transactions. Remember also to review recurring bill charges and other important personal account information.

 

·        Review your health insurance plan statements and claims. Look for unusual or unexpected transactions.

 

·        Shred it! Shred any documents with personal, financial, or medical information before you throw them away.

 

·        Take advantage of free annual credit reports. In the US, the three major credit reporting agencies provide a free credit report once a year upon request.

 

·        If a request for your personal info doesn’t feel right, do not feel obligated to respond! Legitimate companies won’t ask for personal information such as your social security number, password, or account number in a pop-up ad, e-mail, text, or unsolicited phone call.

 

·        Limit the personal information you share on social media. Also, check your privacy settings every time you update an application or operating system (or at least every few months).

 

·        Put a password on it. Protect your on-line accounts and mobile devices with strong, unique passwords or pass-phrases.

 

·        Limit use of public WiFi. Be careful when using free WiFi, which may not be secure. Consider waiting to access on-line banking information or other sensitive accounts until you are at home.

 

·        Secure your devices. Encrypt your hard drive, use a VPN, and ensure that your systems, apps, anti-virus software, and plug-ins are up-to-date.

 

Reference:

http://er.educause.edu/blogs/2016/11/april-2017-dont-be-fooled-protect-yourself-and-your-identity

 

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March 17
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, March 17, 2017

 

March 17, 2017

 

Faculty First 2017 Grant Recipients

Three faculty members have been awarded grants and will partner with OIT through the Faculty First Program to develop engaging and accessible course materials.

Recipients and their topics are:

·        Karen Tobias

Topic: Multimedia for Instruction in the Principles and Practices of Surgery

Tobias, Professor, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, plans to develop an integrated, interactive online manual that uses multimedia to describe and illustrate basic surgery skills.

 

·        Suzy Prentiss

Topic: Redesigning the Speech Anxious Website

Prentiss, Senior Lecturer, School of Communication Studies, wishes to engage students in more meaningful ways on her website for her Communication Studies 240, Business and Professional Communication course. She plans on making the site more interactive and engaging.

 

·        Sally Harris

Topic: Making Online Lectures Accessible and Student Focused

Harris, Distinguished Lecturer, Department of English, proposes a redesign of online lectures for a high-demand course: English 295, Writing in the Workplace.

 

Learn Something New with Lynda.com

Lynda.com now offers more than 5,500 courses and as a student, faculty, or staff at UT Knoxville, you have access to everything Lynda has to offer. You can find a listing of the newest courses at www.lynda.com/newcourses.aspx. The list can be filtered by topics such as 3D, Business, Photography, and Web so you can easily find a course that meets your interests. Just sign into Lynda.com using your UT NetID and Password. Some of the courses released this month include:

 

 

Instructional Technologies Community of Practice:

Discuss Accessibility Tools and Resources

Bring your lunch and a colleague to the next Instructional Technologies Community of Practice (ITCoP) meeting on March 22 from 12:20-1:10 PM in Hodges Library room 220E.  This month’s topic will feature a discussion on effective tools and resources for creating accessible content. 

 

Join the Office of Disability Services and OIT staff in a discussion on effective tools and resources for creating accessible content. 

 

Mark your calendar for the final Spring ITCoP event on April 26. Visit the ITCoP website for more details.

 

Canvas is here! Are you ready?

OIT is offering weekly Virtual Canvas Camps to help you become Canvas Ready before Blackboard retires on May 31, 2017.

 

Have some Canvas questions as you work on your courses? Join us Mon/Wed/Fri from 9 am-noon and Tue/Thu from 1 pm-4 pm via Zoom: http://tiny.utk.edu/canvas-zoom

 

SAS by SAS Institute

SAS is a software suite for statistical analysis, data management and graphics. There are three major products available: the SAS System, which is the primary tool for writing SAS programs and contains the data processing and analytics engine that is at the core of most SAS products; SAS Enterprise Guide, which provides a graphics user interface to much of the power of SAS; SAS Enterprise Miner, which is used for data mining or investigating patterns in large amounts of data to create descriptive or predictive models.

 

Where can I run it? SAS is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows and Linux PCs. The download and installation instructions are on OIT's software download page. It is also available on OIT’s Apps@UT, OIT’s Newton Linux Cluster and on the computers in the OIT public computer labs. There is no simultaneous user limit for SAS.

 

How can I learn it? OIT offers workshops each semester. You can schedule a one-on-one tutorial any time by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 974-9900. The SAS Institute support web site offers free video tutorials.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for SAS. You can request assistance by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 974-9900. The SAS Institute support web site also offers “support communities” where you can ask questions and it provides a comprehensive set of online manuals.

 

Workshops for March 20-24, 2017

Instructor-Focused:

Getting to know Canvas, March 20, 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Creating Accessible One-Shot Videos, March 22, 1:00pm – 3:00pm

 

Researcher-Focused:

Introduction to MATLAB, March 21, 12:00pm – 1:30pm

SPSS 2 (SPSS Data Analysis), March 23, 12:00pm – 2:00pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.

 

Are You Practicing Safe Social Networking?

Who Else Is Online? Social media sites are not well-monitored playgrounds with protectors watching over you to ensure your safety. When you use social media, do you think about who might be using it besides your friends and connections? The following are some of the other users you may encounter:

  • Identity thieves. Cybercriminals need only a few pieces of information to gain access to your financial resources. Phone numbers, addresses, names, and other personal information can be harvested easily from social networking sites and used for identity theft. Cybercrime attacks have moved to social media, because that’s where cybercriminals get their greatest return on investment.
  • Online predators. Are your friends interested in seeing your class schedule online? Well, sex offenders or other criminals could be as well. Knowing your schedule and your whereabouts can make it very easy for someone to victimize you, whether it’s breaking in while you’re gone or attacking you while you’re out.

 

How Do I Protect My Information? Although there are no guaranteed ways to keep your online information secure, following are some tips to help keep your private information private: 

  • Don’t post personal or private information online! The easiest way to keep your information private is to NOT post it. Don’t post your full birthdate, address, or phone numbers online. Don’t hesitate to ask friends to remove embarrassing or sensitive information about you from their posts, either. You can NEVER assume the information you post online is private.
  • Use privacy settings. Most social networking sites provide settings that let you restrict public access to your profile, such as allowing only your friends to view it. 
  • Be wary of others. Many social networking sites do not have a rigorous process to verify the identity of their users. Always be cautious when dealing with unfamiliar people online.
  • Understand the role of hashtags. Hashtags (#) are a popular way to provide clever commentary or to tag specific pictures. Many people restrict access to their Instagram accounts so that only their friends can see their pictures. However, when someone applies a hashtag to a picture that is otherwise private, anyone who searches for that hashtag can see it.

 

Article Reference: http://er.educause.edu/blogs/2016/11/august-2017-are-you-practicing-safe-social-networking

 

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March 10
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, March 10, 2017
 
March 10, 2017
 
Last Chance – Complete the Annual OIT Customer Satisfaction Survey Today!
If you have not completed the Annual OIT Customer Satisfaction survey, we would like to hear from you!  Complete the survey online at https://tiny.utk.edu/oitcustomersurvey.  The survey will take approximately 10 to 15 minutes.  Your responses are anonymous and will be shown only in summary reports.
 
The survey closes today at 5:00 p.m.
 
Upon exiting the survey, you can choose to enter a drawing for $100. There is no purchase or fee of any kind required to participate in the drawing.
 
Network changes scheduled Spring Break
As part of a plan to consolidate data centers, OIT will be completing several maintenance projects during Spring Break.
 
On Sunday, March 12 between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM EDT, Network Services will be relocating routers and security devices that provide most of our internet connectivity. To minimize the impact during the maintenance, one of our other internet providers will provide additional bandwidth. However, you may experience slowness during the maintenance window.
 
Beginning Wednesday, March 15 at 10:00 PM EDT, Network Services will be moving core firewall hardware. We do not anticipate any disruption of service as this hardware is part of a redundant pair.  The move will be completed by 2:00 AM EDT on Thursday, March 16.
 
On Sunday, March 19 between 8:00 AM and 12:00 PM EDT, Network Services will be relocating components of the wireless infrastructure. We do not anticipate any disruption of service as this hardware is part of a redundant system. 
 
If you have any questions about this project, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.
 
Firefox 52 and Banner INB, Argos, and Nolij
This week, Mozilla updated Firefox to version 52 which marks a fundamental shift on how the web browser handles plug-ins other than Adobe's Flash Player. First announced late last year, Firefox 52 is the first release that disables all plugins that use the Netscape Plugin API (NPAPI) besides Flash. Plug-ins such as Silverlight, Java, Acrobat, and Google Hangouts are no longer supported, and Flash content is only activated with user consent. This update will also affect several UT applications such as Banner INB, Nolij, and Argos.
 
Banner INB and Nolij: Users are recommended to disable updates and not upgrade to Firefox 52. To do this in Firefox, go to Options >Advanced > Update tab and select “Never check for updates.”
 
Argos: If you are a user of the Argos client software (this pertains to all browsers), when you attempt to launch Argos users will notice a small change the next time you log in. Upon login, you will be prompted to download and install a small application that will replace the plug-in that is no longer supported by Firefox. 
 
Regarding the future of browser plug-in support, Firefox is only the first to move in this direction, as Google has already announced that the same changes are coming to Chrome browser early this year.
 
Canvas is Mobile!
The Canvas by Instructure App is the mobile version of Canvas that helps you stay current with all courses anywhere you go. It is available for iOS and Android devices through the Apple App Store and Google Play, respectively. 
 
A complete list of features and functions available online for all mobile platforms. 
 
Support Guides for these platforms are also available online:
 
For assistance with the Canvas by Instructure App or converting your course to Canvas, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.
 
OIT is also offering weekly Virtual Canvas Camps to help you become Canvas Ready before Blackboard retires on May 31, 2017.
 
Join us Mon/Wed/Fri from 9 am-noon and Tue/Thu from 1 pm-4 pm via Zoom, http://tiny.utk.edu/canvas-zoom
 
R by the R Core Team 
What is it? R is a free, open source software environment for statistical computing, data management and graphics. While all of its features can be controlled by its programming language, several user interfaces exist that make it easy for non-programmers to use. It is very extensible and supports a wide range of methods. However, its data usually must fit into your computer’s main memory, limiting the size of data sets it can analyze.
 
Where can I run it? Being free, you can install R on any Linux, Mac or Windows computer. R is available on OIT’s Apps@UT, OIT’s Newton Linux Cluster and in the OIT public labs. There is no simultaneous user limit for R.
 
How can I learn it? OIT offers workshops each semester and there are a set of two-minute tutorials at the “twotorials” web site. The main R web site lists addresses for support “mailing lists” and manuals.
 
Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for R; contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900 for assistance. 
 
Additional resources include:
  • Stack Overflow: ask questions or look up answers regarding R programming
  • Cross Validated:  ask questions or look up answers regarding statistical analysis in R
 
Workshops for March 10 - 14, 2017
Instructor-Focused:
Teaching in a Technology Enhanced Classroom, March 14, 1 pm – 2:30 pm
Prezi Tips for Conferences, March 15, 1 pm – 2:30 pm
 
Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).
 
All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.
 
Protect your Personal, Financial, Tax Information and Computers
WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today reminded taxpayers to be cautious and protect personal, financial and tax information, particularly at tax time. This year’s tax-filing deadline is April 18.
 
The IRS urges taxpayers to be safe online and reminds them to take steps to help protect personal information and guard against identity theft. This is true all year long, but particularly at tax time, when taxpayers may anticipate hearing about a tax refund or the status of their return.
 
“The IRS works year-round to protect taxpayers against scams and identity theft,” said John Koskinen, IRS Commissioner. “But we can’t do this alone. Taxpayers can do their part by taking certain precautions to stay ahead of these would-be con artists.”
 
Treat personal information like cash – don’t hand it out to just anyone. Social Security numbers, credit card numbers, bank and utility account numbers can be used to steal money or open new accounts. Every time a taxpayer receives a request for personal information, they should think
about whether the request is truly necessary. Scammers will do everything they can to appear trustworthy and legitimate.
 
Avoid Phishing Scams
 
The easiest way for criminals to steal sensitive data is simply to ask for it. Taxpayers should learn to recognize phishing emails, calls or texts that pose as familiar organizations such as banks, credit card companies or even the IRS. These ruses generally urge taxpayers to give
up sensitive data such as passwords, Social Security numbers and bank account or credit card numbers. They are called phishing scams because they attempt to lure the receiver into taking the bait. The subject line may suggest the recipient just won a free cruise or that they must
immediately update an account. Never open a link or an attachment from a suspicious email. It may contain malware.
 
Also, don’t assume internet advertisements, pop-up ads or emails are from reputable companies. Check out companies to find out if they are legitimate. When online, a little research can save money and reduce security risks. If an ad or offer looks too good to be true, take a
moment to check out the company behind it. Type the company or product name into a search engine with terms like “review,” “complaint” or “scam.”
 
Never download “security” software from a pop-up ad. A pervasive ploy is a pop-up ad that indicates it has detected a virus on the computer. It urges users to download a security software package. Don’t fall for it. It most likely will install some type of malware. Reputable security
software companies do not advertise in this manner.
 
Protect Personal Data
 
Taxpayers should not carry Social Security cards with them or any documents that may include this number. Provide Social Security numbers only when necessary. Occasionally businesses will request it when it is not essential.
 
Give personal information over encrypted websites only. Shopping or banking online should be done only on sites that use encryption. To determine if a website is encrypted, look for “https” at the beginning of the web address (the “s” stands for secure). Some websites use encryption only on the sign-in page. If any part of the session isn’t encrypted, the entire account and the included financial information could be vulnerable. Look for “https” on every page of the site.
 
Use Strong Passwords
 
The longer the password, the tougher it is to crack. Use at least 10 characters; 12 is ideal for most home users. Mix letters, numbers and special characters. Try to be unpredictable – don’t use names, birthdates or common words. Don’t use the same password for many accounts. If the password is stolen –– it can be used to take over multiple accounts. Don’t share passwords on the phone, in texts or by email. Legitimate companies will not send messages asking for passwords. Receiving such a message probably means it’s a scam. Keep passwords in a
secure place.
 
Set password and encryption protections for wireless networks. If a home or business Wi-Fi is unsecured it also allows any computer within range to access the wireless network and potentially steal information from connected devices.
 
Use Security Software
 
Make sure you have security software installed on all of your devices that connect to the internet. Many computers come pre-installed with firewall and anti-virus protections. A good broad-based anti-malware program should provide protection from viruses, Trojans, spyware and adware.
 
Set security software to update automatically so it can be upgraded as threats emerge. Also, make sure the security software is “on” at all times. If retaining important financial documents, such as prior-year tax returns, consider investing in encryption software to prevent unauthorized access by hackers or identity thieves.
 
Make sure security software has parental control options to protect children from malicious websites. Educate children about the threats of opening suspicious web pages, emails or documents.
 
Back Up Files
 
No system is completely secure. Copy important files, including federal and state tax returns, onto a removable disc or a back-up drive, and store it in a safe place. Save tax returns and records. Federal and state tax returns are important financial documents that a taxpayer may
need for many reasons, ranging from home mortgages to college financial aid applications. Print out a copy and keep it in a safe place. Make an electronic copy in a safe spot as well. These steps also can help taxpayers more easily prepare next year’s tax return. If storing sensitive tax and financial records on a personal computer, use a file encryption program to add an additional layer of security.
 
The IRS, state tax agencies and the tax industry recently launched a public awareness campaign called Taxes. Security. Together. It provides additional safety tips for taxpayers. Also, see Publication 4524, Security Awareness for Taxpayers.
 
 
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Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.
 
 
 
March 03
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, March 3, 2017
 
March 3, 2017
 
OIT Services affected by Amazon Web Services outage
Several UT applications experienced an interruption in service on Tuesday, February 28 due to an outage at Amazon Web Services (AWS).  AWS is the platform for many websites and applications worldwide, including a number of products licensed for use at UT.  Some of the OIT-managed applications affected by this outage include Canvas, Zoom, Respondus Lockdown Browser, and Turning Technologies (Clickers).  Our partners, especially Canvas, communicated with us as information was available.  You may have experienced intermittent service for these providers as well as many other websites between noon and 5:00 PM on Tuesday.  As soon as AWS restored service, Canvas and other sites became available.
 
Read more at USA Today about what caused the Amazon Web Services outage.
 
Office 365: Microsoft Discontinuing Office 365 version of Office 2013
Beginning March 1, 2017, Office for 2013 is no longer available as an option for download through the Office 365 portal.  Microsoft recommends that anyone using Office 2013 upgrade to the Office 2016 version as they will end mainstream support for Office 2013 on April 10, 2018. OIT will continue to offer Office 2013 for University-owned computers through the OIT Software Download Site
 
Visit the OIT website for more information about Office 365 ProPlus for Staff and Faculty and the Microsoft Student Advantage programs.
 
OIT’s Active Directory Upgrade is complete 
OIT system administrators have recently completed a project to provide a more robust and resilient Active Directory (AD) infrastructure.  The UTK Domain Controllers have been upgraded to Windows Server 2016 and are running on newer and faster hardware.  In addition, to create an infrastructure that can be upgraded more regularly without interrupting university operations, we also have setup a third party certified round-robin, gc.utk.tennessee.edu. This round-robin is now available to UT system administrators for authentication and global catalog services.
 
If you have any questions about this project, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.
 
We Need YOUR Input
As we continuously seek to better the information technology services for UT Knoxville, OIT needs your input. We ask you to please take 10-15 minutes to complete our annual customer satisfaction survey at https://tiny.utk.edu/oitcustomersurvey. Almost 1,000 people have already provided their feedback this week. Over the years, the information from this survey has contributed directly to initiatives such as the Google deployment, Office 365 and network upgrades. More recently, projects where customer feedback resulted in change include the Canvas implementation (our headline article today notwithstanding) and additional investment in upgrading classroom technology. Your input truly counts. Upon exiting the survey, you can choose to enter a drawing for $100. There is no purchase or fee of any kind required to participate in the drawing.
 
Qualtrics Research Suite by Qualtrics, Inc. 
What is it? Qualtrics Research Suite, a powerful online survey research tool, is available to all faculty, staff, and students at UTC, UTK, and UTM. Once you create your Qualtrics account, you will be able to design simple to complex surveys in a web browser, distribute the survey, run frequencies as it continues to collect data and then download your data. For in-depth analysis, you can export your data to an SPSS, CSV, TXT or Excel file. A basic account is available to all faculty, staff, and students for university-related work such as academic research projects (instructional or academic) and administrative purposes.
 
Where can I run it? Qualtrics is a cloud-based service. Create a new account or log in to an existing account from our web surveys page.
 
How can I learn it? For UTK, OIT offers workshops on Qualtrics each semester, and you can schedule a one-on-one tutorial by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.  Qualtrics also provides a variety of training materials on their support page.
 
Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for Qualtrics. For assistance, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.
 
Workshops for March 6 - 10, 2017
Instructor-Focused:
BYOD with WolfVision Cynap, March 8, 3:30 – 5 pm
Getting to know Canvas, March 9, 1 pm – 3 pm
 
Researcher-Focused:
Qualtrics 1 (Web Survey Design), March 7, 1 pm – 3 pm
SPSS 1 (Basics), March 8, 12 pm – 2 pm
Qualtrics 2 (Reporting and Analysis Tools), March 10, 11 am – 1 pm
NVivo11 Fundamentals, March 10, 11:30 am – 1 pm
 
Student-Focused:
Overview of Web Development, March 6, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm
Adobe Photoshop 3 (Banners, Brushes, and Colors), March 7, 9:40 am – 11:40 am
Office 365: Sharing and Collaborating, March 7, 9:40 am – 11:40 am
Adobe PhotoShop 4 (Photo Manipulation), March 9, 9:40 am – 11:40 am
 
Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).
 
All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.
 
Keep What is PrivatePrivate
You exist in digital form all over the Internet. It is thus important to ensure that the digital you matches what you intend to share. It is also critical to guard your privacy — not only to avoid embarrassment but also to protect your identity and finances!
 
Following are specific steps you can take to protect your online information, identity, and privacy.
 
  • Use a unique password for each site. Hackers often use previously compromised information to access other sites. Choosing unique passwords keeps that risk to a minimum.
  • Use a password manager. Using an encrypted password manager to store your passwords makes it easy to access and use a unique password for each site.
  • Know what you are sharing. Check the privacy settings on all of your social media accounts; some even include a wizard to walk you through the settings. Always be cautious about what you post publicly.
  • Guard your date of birth and telephone number. These are key pieces of information used for verification, and you should not share them publicly. If an online service or site asks you to share this critical information, consider whether it is important enough to warrant it.
  • Keep your work and personal presences separate. Your employer has the right to access your e-mail account, so you should use an outside service for private e-mails. A private e-mail account helps you ensure uninterrupted access to your private e-mail and other services if you switch employers.
  • There are no true secrets online. Use the postcard or billboard test: Would you be comfortable with everyone reading a message or post? If not, don't share it.
 
 
 
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Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.
 
 
 
February 24
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, February 24, 2017
 
February 24, 2017
 
 
Classification Survey: Frequently Asked Questions
The Classification Survey initiative continues as we ask faculty, staff, and student employees using university computing equipment to complete a brief survey identifying the type of data stored, viewed or processed on their university-owned equipment. 
 
Since January 23rd, 4,800 university-owned devices have been classified; approximately 31,000 university-owned devices remain on the classification list. Some of the most frequently asked questions we receive are answered below.
 
Where do I log in to complete my survey?
 
What is the purpose of this survey and why do I have to complete it?
Cybersecurity has been and continues to be an area of concern in an organization as large as UT. One of the first questions typically asked of us when a security incident occurs is what kind of data was potentially exposed and were any data files transferred off the device?  Knowing how you use University data on your machine helps answer those questions and evaluate the level of exposure of data.  We have focused on enterprise class systems in the past. We are now focusing on collecting that information for all UT-owned equipment on desktops and in departments
 
The faculty or staff member (or in some cases the student) assigned to a given system typically has the best knowledge about that system and therefore is the one who can best answer the survey.  The IT Support person in your department typically does not have that information but you may ask them to sit with you if you need assistance answering the questions.
 
Why are you asking me about my personal information?
One of the common misconceptions is that we are asking you to report what information is stored (Jane Doe’s social security number or Jack Doe’s credit card number) on your computer.  Instead, we are asking you to report the type of information.  For example, if you have social security numbers, grade rosters, medical records, etc., we are asking to you to tell us that you have this information, not whose information it is.
 
  • You do NOT need to report your personal information.
  • You DO need to report if you view or process information the type of information asked in the questions.
 
On the classify.utk.edu page, all of my computers are in the section “Devices Not Requiring Immediate Attention.”  What do I need to do?
You have two options regarding the devices that do not need immediate attention.  You can classify them now, or you can wait to receive email notifications for the specific device.  Once you receive the first notification, you will have 30 days to complete the survey.
 
 
 
Plagiarism Prevention/Detection for Canvas
Unplag for Canvas has arrived.
Unplag is a plagiarism prevention/detection system integrated into Canvas.  You will find that the system is very similar to SafeAssign in Blackboard. 
 
Unplag has been fully integrated into Canvas and can easily be implemented into your course assignments. We have moved our SafeAssign repository of submitted papers from Blackboard to our Unplag institutional repository.
 
See the guides below for instructions on how to use Unplag in your Canvas courses and let us know if you have any difficulties. We will be adding new training opportunities soon!
 
 
For assistance with Unplag or converting your course to Canvas, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.
 
OIT is also offering weekly Virtual Canvas Camps to help you become Canvas Ready before Blackboard retires on May 31, 2017.
Join us Mon/Wed/Fri from 9 am-noon and Tue/Thu from 1 pm-4 pm via Zoom, http://tiny.utk.edu/canvas-zoom
 
Rasputin
Last week, an article was published which contained a list of some 60 universities and government agencies that had been “hacked” by the cyber-criminal known as Rasputin. The University of Tennessee was on the list, and OIT was notified about the breach. OIT staff contacted “Recorded Future” for details about the hack.
 
Recorded Future provided information regarding a departmental website that was vulnerable. The vulnerability was verified by OIT, the local IT staff for the department was notified, and the vulnerability was resolved.
 
The website did not contain any information of a confidential nature. Recorded Future stated that “With a high degree of confidence, we believe that Ubercri [aka Rasputin] has not (to date) downloaded internal data from the respective victim systems, nor attempted to monetize the access in the criminal underground.” Rasputin doesn’t “sell the information”; he sells the code that he used to exploit or, “hack,” the site.
 
OIT follows a documented procedure when developing applications or websites which include testing the site for vulnerabilities BEFORE it goes live. Departments are encouraged to contact the OIT HelpDesk at (865) 974-9900 if they are launching a new website or application and request that it be tested for vulnerabilities. This test is especially important if the site is connecting to data sources or collecting information from users.
 
The entire article can be viewed at https://tiny.utk.edu/recorded-future
 
QDA Miner by Provalis Research, Inc. 
What is it? QDA Miner is a software package which aids in the qualitative analysis of text or images. In addition to purely qualitative functions like creating and applying coding structures, QDA Miner also provides more numerical functions such as analysis of coding co-occurrences and analyzing coding by other variables such as age or gender.
 
Where can I run it? QDA Miner is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs. The download and installation instructions are on OIT's software download page. For UTK, QDA Miner is also available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and the computers in the OIT public computer labs. There is no simultaneous user limit for QDA Miner.
 
How can I learn it? For UTK, OIT offers workshops on QDA Miner each semester, and you can schedule a one-on-one tutorial by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 8965-974-9900. Tutorials are also available on QDA Miner's tutorial website.
 
Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for this software. For assistance, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 974-9900.
 
Anything else I need to know? A trial version of QDA Miner is available for download. A license file can be downloaded from the OIT's software download page which turns the evaluation software into a fully licensed copy.
 
 
Workshops for February 13 - 17, 2017
Instructor-Focused:
Getting to Know Canvas, February 28, 2 pm – 4 pm
Getting to Know Canvas, March 1, 10 am – 12 pm
 
Researcher-Focused:
Introduction to SQLite Database, February 27, 1 pm – 3 pm
Mixed Model Analysis in SPSS, February 28, 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
 
Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).
 
All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.
 
 
The Cloud
The cloud is a service provider that stores and manages data for its customers. The advantages of using the cloud are that you can access your data from multiple devices and can share the data more easily with who you desire. The reason this service is known as “the cloud” is that you often do not know where your data is physically being stored. Examples of “the cloud” include Google Apps, Amazon cloud, Office 365, and Apple iCloud.
 
The cloud has its advantages, but you must also take the proper steps in protecting yourself when selecting a cloud provider. For your work computer or work related information, check with OIT to see which cloud services are provided. Be sure to understand how your data will get from your computer to the cloud and how your information will be stored in the cloud. Finally, make sure the connection is secured by encryption and understand who can decrypt your data. As a steward of the information, it is your responsibility to protect and dispose of the university information left to your keeping.
 
As a reminder, OIT will post email scams to the Recent Email Scams tab within the OIT System Status Center.  If you have concerns or questions about “the cloud,” you should contact the OIT HelpDesk at (865) 974-9900.
 
Remember, no one in OIT, the OIT HelpDesk, or any legitimate online entity will ever ask you for your password via email.
 
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Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.
 
 
February 17
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, February 17, 2017
 
February 17, 2017
 
OIT conducting surveys to improve wireless coverage
As part of OIT’s continuous improvement efforts, the Network Services team is conducting wireless surveys in buildings across campus to determine if additional coverage is necessary. 
 
These surveys will not affect your wireless service, and we make every effort to cause minimal disruptions while we collect this information.  We are working with the building representatives to find the best time to schedule each building’s survey.  Do not be surprised to see us gathering data in hallways, offices, conference rooms, and classrooms.  We have mounted our equipment on a cart that we will roll throughout the buildings.
 
If you have any questions regarding this initiative, please contact the OIT HelpDesk at help.utk.edu or 865-974-9900.
 
OIT upgrade to Active Directory
OIT will be upgrading our Active Directory (AD) infrastructure from Windows Server 2008 R2 to Server 2016 over the next four weeks. There are many new enhancements in Windows Server 2016 as well as being on faster and more redundant hardware. Some of the new features include privileged access management, Azure AD Join, and Microsoft Passport.
 
We do not anticipate an interruption of service to Windows or Mac OS 10.7+ computers which are joined to the domain. If you have an older MAC (<10.7) that is joined to the domain, you may have to unbind and rebind to AD.
 
If you have any questions regarding this initiative, please contact the OIT HelpDesk at help.utk.edu or 865-974-9900
 
Instructional Technologies Community of Practice
Bring your lunch and a colleague to the next Instructional Technologies Community of Practice (ITCoP) meeting on February 22 from 12:20-1:10 PM in Hodges Library room 220E.  This month’s topic will feature a discussion on multimodal composition using images, audio, or video in assignments.
 
Join Jeff Ringer, Assistant Professor of English and Writing Program Director; Robert Spirko, Senior Lecturer in English and a 2016-17 OIT Faculty Fellow; and others in a discussion about going beyond text and writing to make your assignments more accessible and interesting.
 
Mark your calendar for Spring ITCoP events on March 22 and April 26.  Visit the ITCoP website for more details.
 
Canvas is here! Are you ready?
OIT is offering weekly Virtual Canvas Camps to help you become Canvas Ready before Blackboard retires on May 31, 2017.
Join us Mon/Wed/Fri from 9 am-noon and Tue/Thu from 1 pm-4 pm via Zoom, http://tiny.utk.edu/canvas-zoom
 
Origin Pro by OriginLab Corporation
What is it? Origin Pro is graphing and data analysis software that provides a comprehensive solution for scientists and engineers who need to analyze, graph and professionally present data. Origin Pro's point-and-click interface allows you to start using it quickly, yet its wide range of advanced features provides for your growing needs.
 
Where can I run it? For UTK, Origin Pro is available on Apps@UT and in the OIT public computer labs. The simultaneous user limit for Origin Pro is five. 
 
How can I learn it? Origin's online documentation and video tutorials are an excellent source of information.  The online documentation includes the user guide, tutorials, quick help on specific topics, programming examples and reference information. In addition, OriginLab provides free, live training webinars that teach you how to perform various tasks in Origin Pro. 
 
Where can I get support? For UTK, OIT offers Minimal Support for Origin Pro.
 
Technical support from Originlab is included with UTK's maintenance package. OriginLab provides four ways for you to contact their technical support representatives:
  • Call 1-800-969-7720 and select Option 6, Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM to 6 PM EST
  • Use the Online Chat option available through the Originlab website
  • Send email to tech@originlab.com
  • Select Support on the Originlab website for links to the additional support resources, including the Technical Support FAQ, User Forums, and the File Exchange which provides a venue for sharing files and custom applications with other users.
 
Workshops for February 13 - 17, 2017
Instructor-Focused:
Improving Your Web Pages' Visibility in Search Engine Results (SEO), February 20, 1 – 3 pm
Creating Video with a Mobile Device and SWIVL, February 23, 1 – 3 pm
Getting to Know Canvas, February 24, 1 – 3 pm
 
Researcher-Focused:
SAS Programming Basics 1, February 21, 1:30 - 3:30 pm
SAS Data Analysis, February 22, 10 am – 12 pm
Introduction to ArcGIS Pro, February 22, 12 – 2 pm
JMP Basics, February 23, 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
 
Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).
 
All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.
 
 
Refuse the Phishing Bait!!
Cybercriminals know the best strategies for gaining access to the university’s sensitive data. In most cases, it doesn’t involve them rappelling from the top of Andy Holt Tower and deftly avoiding a laser detection system to hack into your servers; instead, they simply manipulate a community member’s trust by posing as something they trust.
According to IBM’s 2014 Cyber Security Intelligence Index, human error is a factor in 95 percent of security incidents. Following are a few ways to identify various types of social engineering attacks and their telltale signs.
  • Phishing isn’t relegated to just e-mail! Cybercriminals will also launch phishing attacks through phone calls, text messages, or other online messaging applications. Don’t know the sender or caller? Seem too good to be true? It’s probably a phishing attack.
  • Know the signs. Does the e-mail contain a vague salutation, spelling or grammatical errors, an urgent request, and/or an offer that seems impossibly good? Click that delete button.
  • Verify the sender. Check the sender’s e-mail address to make sure it’s legitimate. If it appears that the OIT HelpDesk is asking you to click on a link to increase your mailbox quota, but the sender is “UniversityHelpDesk@yahoo.com,” it’s a phishing message.
  • Don’t be duped by aesthetics. Phishing e-mails often contain convincing logos, links to actual company websites, legitimate phone numbers, and e-mail signatures of actual employees. However, if the message is urging you to take action — especially action such as sending sensitive information, clicking on a link, or downloading an attachment — exercise caution and look for other telltale signs of phishing attacks. Don’t hesitate to contact the company directly; they can verify legitimacy and may not even be aware that their name is being used for fraud.
  • Never, ever share your password. Did we say never? Yup, we mean never. Your password is the key to your identity, your data, and your classmates’ and colleagues’ data. It is for your eyes only. OIT will never ask you for your password.
  • Avoid opening links and attachments from unknown senders. Get into the habit of typing known URLs into your browser. Don’t open attachments unless you’re expecting a file from someone. Give them a call if you’re suspicious.
  • When you’re not sure, call to verify. Let’s say you receive an e-mail claiming to be from someone you know — a friend, colleague, or even the UT Chancellor or UT President. Cybercriminals often spoof addresses to convince you, then request that you perform an action such as transfer funds or provide sensitive information. If something seems off about the e-mail, call them at a known number listed in your institution’s directory to confirm the request.
  • Don’t talk to strangers! Receive a call from someone you don’t know? Are they asking you to provide information or making odd requests? Hang up the phone and report it to the OIT HelpDesk at (865) 974-9900.
  • Don’t be tempted by abandoned flash drives. Cybercriminals may leave flash drives lying around for victims to pick up and insert, thereby unknowingly installing malware on their computers. You might be tempted to insert a flash drive only to find out the rightful owner, but be wary — it could be a trap.
  • See someone suspicious? Say something. If you notice someone suspicious walking around or “tailgating” someone else, especially in an off-limits area, call UTPD.
 
and click on “Join or leave the list (or change settings)”
 
 
Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.
 
 
 
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