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The IT Weekly Archive for the Office of Information Technology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
November 17
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, November 17, 2017

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

November 17, 2017

 

Nolij to Hyland OnBase Enterprise Document Management System

OIT is currently underway with the conversion to Hyland Onbase Document Managemetn and the retirement of the Nolij document imaging system. As Nolij will no longer be supported in late 2018, OIT is working to set up all current Nolij-using offices in OnBase, and then begin converting Nolij documents to OnBase in late spring, 2018.  

 

This past summer the Registrar’s Office and Financial Aid respectively implemented their Transfer Course Evaluation & Fin Aid Verification solutions within OnBase. By the end of the year, the Student Loan department and Bursar’s Office will begin using OnBase for their document imaging services. 

 

OIT will work with each office using Nolij before their conversion to configure relevant OnBase information such as users, keywords, and document types.  Departments will then work with current & future documents in OnBase while using Nolij to access older ones until their conversion is complete.

 

If you have any questions about this project, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.

 


Faculty First 2018

Call for proposals are due Monday, December 11, 2017

 

Do you have a vision for your course on how to improve student learning and need assistance with development of course materials? Through the Faculty First Grant, the Office of Information Technology (OIT) will build a long-term partnership with you to redesign your course and develop instructional materials. Learn more about the Faculty First Program and download the Call for Proposal instructions.

As a Faculty First grant recipient, you serve as a subject matter expert, and OIT provides its professional expertise, including instructional designers, graphic and web designers, multimedia developers, Universal Design for Learning specialist, and instructional technology specialists.

Remember, if you have a small project, you do not need to apply for this grant. We are here to help you anytime.
Contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900 and request faculty assistance with one of our instructional designers.

 


Office 365: New App Launcher Is Here

The new app launcher is rolling out to the UT tenant now.

 

It is personalized to your Office 365 use and will help you open and switch between the apps you use most. On the main app launcher screen, you will see the apps that you most frequently use as well as the most common Office 365 apps, such as Outlook and Calendar.  You will also have access to an alphabetized list of all Office 365 apps.  These apps can be added to your main screen at any time.

 

Have you ever wondered what some of these apps do?  Microsoft is also introducing a new Office 365 gallery page, accessible from www.office.com, that will help you better understand the apps, tools, and services that are part of your Office 365 account.  To access this content, choose “Explore Your Apps” within the app launcher.

 

If you have any questions, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.

 


ArcGIS from Esri

What is it? ESRI’s ArcGIS is an integrated suite of software products used for mapping and spatial reasoning. In addition to creating maps, it can be used to compile and analyze geographic data, manage geographic databases, and allow users to collaborate and perform research as teams. Spatial analytics and 3D modeling features are also integrated into ESRI products. ESRI software allows users to apply location-based analysis tools in order to analyze and visualize data. Users can share findings and collaborate with others via apps, maps, and reports.  It also provides a platform for making maps and geographic information accessible on the Web for the public or UT user communities. Most ArcGIS features can be controlled by menus, but programming using Python and JavaScript will provide advanced functionality.

 

What can I use it for? Students, faculty, and staff can use ArcGIS for university-related academic (not administrative) purposes. Use that benefits outside organizations requires the purchase of a commercial license.

 

Where can I run it?  ArcGIS desktop products are available on Windows machines in most OIT Computer Labs. Students, faculty and staff can download ArcGIS 10.5 for Desktop and ArcGIS Pro software for no additional cost from the OIT software distribution site and install it on UT owned machines. Compatible operating systems include Windows, Windows Server, and Linux Servers. Contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900 for additional ESRI software that is available for download.

 

How can I learn it? To get started with ArcGIS, you can enroll in virtual training classes through the ESRI Virtual Campus. In order to access all the available training, students must first have an ArcGIS Online Account and then request training be added to their AGOL by contacting OIT help desk.  OIT offers introductory workshops on ESRI software throughout the year.   Extensive online help is available from ESRI.  Lynda online training library offers free ArcGIS training videos to registered members.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for ArcGIS. For additional licensing information, contact the OIT Help Desk.

 


Upcoming Workshops

 

Instructors

ePortfolios for Developing and Assessing Student Professional Competencies

December 4, 2:25pm – 4:25pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


Don’t Fall For Fake Customer Support Scams!

Technical support scams are built on the deception that your computer is somehow broken, and you need to contact technical support to fix it. In some cases, the tech support agent may ask you to install other software or malware disguised as support tools on your computer, bringing in more threats that can cause even more damage.

 

Scammers may call, place alarming pop-up messages on your computer, offer free “security” scans, or set up fake websites – all to convince you that your computer is infected. The scammers try to get you on the phone, and then work to convince you there’s a problem. Finally, they ask you to pay them to fix that non-existent problem.

 

To convince you that both the scammers and the problems are real, the scammers may:

·       pretend to be from a well-known company – like Microsoft, Chase VISA, Dell, AT&T, or Apple

·       use lots of technical terms to convince and confuse you

·       ask you to get on your computer and open some files – and then tell you those files show a problem (when they don’t)

 

Then, once they’ve convinced you that your computer has a problem, the scammers might:

  • ask you to give them remote access to your computer – which lets them change your computer settings, so your computer is vulnerable to attack
  • trick you into installing malware that gives them access to your computer and sensitive data, like user names and passwords
  • try to sell you software that’s worthless, or that you could get elsewhere for free
  • try to enroll you in a worthless computer maintenance or warranty program
  • ask for credit card information so they can bill you for phony services, or services you could get elsewhere for free
  • direct you to websites and ask you to enter your credit card number and other personal information

 

These scammers want to get your money, access to your computer, or both. But there are things you can do to stop them.

  • If you get an unexpected or urgent call from someone who claims to be tech support, hang up. It’s not a real call. And don’t rely on caller ID to prove who a caller is. Criminals can make caller ID seem like they’re calling from a legitimate company or a local number.
  • If you get a pop-up message that tells you to call tech support, ignore it. There are legitimate pop-ups from your security software to do things like update your operating system. But do not call a number that pops up on your screen in a warning about a computer problem.
  • If you’re concerned about your computer, call your security software company directly – but don’t use the phone number in the pop-up or on caller ID. Instead, look for the company’s contact information online, or on a software package or your receipt.
  • Never share passwords or give control of your computer to anyone who contacts you.

 

Article Reference:
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0346-tech-support-scams

 


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November 10
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, November 10, 2017

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

November 10, 2017

 

NEW: Accessibility Checker for Canvas

The Accessibility Checker makes it easy for anyone creating content in Canvas to identify and correct some of the most common accessibility issues, saving time, and providing a better experience for all users. When working in the Rich Content Editor within Canvas, you can activate the Accessibility Checker from the toolbar. When activated, it performs an accessibility check on the current content, reports problem areas or concerns and makes it easy to correct any issues. While the Accessibility Checker does not currently examine linked documents, it is extremely useful for everyone using Canvas.

 

If you have any questions about the Accessibility Checker or need assistance with Canvas, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.

 

 


Everyone can learn, but not everyone learns the same way

Attend a new workshop on applying Universal Design Strategies

 

Why is UDL exploding in institutes of higher education around the United States? Because designing and delivering instruction through the UDL framework consistently leads to improved student retention, persistence, and satisfaction.

 

The practice of UDL challenges traditional methods through intentionally, proactively designing as if our students aren't “average” (they aren’t). Development of clear learning objectives, alignment of assessments, and provision of flexibility whenever and wherever it is sensible puts learning squarely in students’ hands. Students in UDL classrooms not only learn to be chemists, teachers, sociologists, etc.… but learn to be expert learners.

 

Sign up for the “Include Diverse Learners on Canvas with UDL” workshop on Wednesday, November 15 from 10:10 am-11:25 am. Attendees will walk away with concrete strategies for using UDL principles to make your Canvas courses better for all of your students.

 

If you are unable to attend this workshop and want to learn more about designing effective assessments, check out our asynchronous, self-paced course, Implementing UDL on Canvas.  For a sneak peek, check out this three-minute clip.


If you have any questions or would like more information about UDL,
contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900


Learn more about Affordable Resources to Enhance Student Success

Join us on Wednesday, November 15, 12:20 pm to 1:10 pm in Hodges Library Practice Presentation Room (220E) to learn about Accessing Open Educational Resources (OER). 

 

Bring your lunch and a colleague to attend the November Instructional Technology Community of Practice (ITCoP) discussion.  Presenters include Rachel Caldwell, UTK’s Scholarly Communication & Publishing Librarian and Adam Alsamadisi, Geography GA and Geography 101 Instructor. 


Visit the ITCoP website for more information.

 


Amos for Windows by SPSS, an IBM company

What is it? Amos (Analysis of Moment Structures) analyzes Structural Equations Models (SEM) by either drawing a path diagram or via a command language. These models are also known as LISREL models, confirmatory factor analysis, analysis of covariance structures, path analysis, or causal modeling.

 

Where can I run it? Amos is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs. The download and installation instructions are on the OIT software download page. For UTK, Amos is also available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and in the OIT public computer labs. There is no simultaneous user limit for Amos.

 

How can I learn it? You can schedule a one-on-one tutorial anytime by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900. A tutorial is also provided as part of the Amos Help files.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for this software. For assistance, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Workshops for November 13 – 17, 2017

Adobe

Adobe Photoshop 3 (Banners, Brushes, and Colors), November 14, 9:40 am – 11:40 am

Adobe Photoshop 4 (Photo Manipulation), November 16, 9:40 am – 11:40 am

 

Instructors

Turning Point 8 and Enhanced Learning, November 16, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

BYOD with WolfVision Cynap, November 16, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Teaching in a Technology Enhanced Classroom (TEC), November 16, 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Using UDL to Design Quality Courses in Canvas, November 15, 10:10 am – 11:25 am

 

Microsoft

Microsoft Excel 3 (Advanced Features), November 17, 9:05 am – 11:00 am

 

Research

Introduction to ESRI tools available to UTK community, November 14, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

SPSS AMOS: Structural equation modeling, November 17, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Collector for ArcGIS and Survey123: Collecting Qualitative Data in a GIS Context, November 17, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


Online Holiday Shopping

With the holiday’s right around the corner, many of us will begin the task of holiday shopping.  As you do so, it is important to be aware that the retail industry is an increasingly attractive target for criminals looking to steal credit card data. 

 

Whether shopping online or in store, it is important that you protect your personal information so that you can avoid being a victim of identity theft. But first, you might ask, “How do I know if my identity has been stolen?”  With the increase in retailer data breaches, consumers must take it upon themselves to closely monitor their account activity. The following are some examples of changes that could indicate someone has accessed your information: 

 

              Unusual or unexplainable charges on your bills

              Phone calls or bills from accounts, products, or services that you do not have

              Failure to receive regular bills or mail 

              New, strange accounts appearing on your credit report

              Unexpected denial of your credit card 

 

Several habits can help protect you from online identity theft: 

 

              Guard your information online. Never provide your personal information to unsolicited emails and advertisements. Holiday deals may be tempting, but checking the retailer’s website first can better protect your information. 

              Clear your logins and passwords. This is especially important if you are working on a public or shared computer.

              Pay for online purchases with your credit card, which has better guarantees under federal law then your online payment services or your debit card. 

              Always verify that you are on a familiar website with security controls before entering personal data.

 


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Archive now available

 

Follow @UT_OIT on Twitter for up-to-date announcements regarding OIT events and outages.

 

November 03
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, November 3, 2017

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

November 3, 2017

 

The Usual Suspects: Phishing

Are you receiving emails about your email account closing or that you are running out of space?  Do these emails appear to be urgent and from an IT administrator?  Many scammers use fear and intimidation to make you believe you must take action to retain access to your account or to stay in school.

 

This year, we have seen an increase in email scams, known as phishing, sent to our faculty, staff, and students.  Many of these are the result of compromised accounts on our campus.  Responding to these scams leads to more compromised accounts and more phishing scams. When a phishing scam is reported to OIT, we take immediate action to protect you.  However, you also need to be aware and not be caught by the scam. 

 

Watch our video or visit the phishing website to learn how to spot an email scam.

 

 

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS EMAIL

  • Check to see if the email has been reported on OIT's System Status Center: Recent Email Scam.
  • Report suspicious emails and phishing scams to abuse@utk.edu. Once reported, delete the message.
  • If you think the message might be legitimate, or if you are worried about the consequences of ignoring it, look up the organization independently and contact them directly.
  • Do not click on links or call phone numbers provided in the message. They may redirect you to fake sites that mimic the real thing.
  • Do not respond to the email.
  • Do not send your password via email.

 

If you have any questions about an email you receive, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900 or help.utk.edu.

 


OneDrive: Files on Demand

Microsoft recently announced that OneDrive Files on Demand is now available with the Windows 10 Fall Creators Build.  With Files On-Demand, you can access all your files in the cloud without having to download them and use storage space on your computer. You don’t have to change the way you work, because all your files—even online files—can be seen in Windows File Explorer and work like other files on your computer. 

 

OneDrive Files on Demand works with both your personal OneDrive files as well as Office 365 group files.

 

To use this feature, you will need to install the Fall Creators Build and update the OneDrive client for your computer.  Once you have signed in, you can enable the Files On-Demand feature.  Once enabled, files stored in the cloud will have a cloud icon next to the file.  Files downloaded to your computer will have a green checkmark.  You can choose to “Free Up Space” by right-clicking on a file.  The file will continue to be available in the cloud, however, the local copy will be removed, and you will free up space on your hard drive.

 

If you have any questions or would like assistance enabling OneDrive Files On-Demand, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Email and the Tennessee Public Records Act

The Tennessee Public Records Act requires that most records related to official business of the university must be made available for inspection by any Tennessee citizen. The law defines a "public record" broadly as a record "made or received pursuant to law or in connection with the transaction of official business of the university, regardless of physical form and specifically including electronic records." Everyone should be mindful in their daily interactions that the use of e-mail to transact official university business is subject to the Public Records Act.

 

It is also important to note that the Public Records Act requires the university to disclose UT employee information such as name, title and salary information upon request by a Tennessee citizen. However, the Public Records Act does not require the university to disclose certain confidential employee information, such as employees' home addresses, Social Security numbers or banking information.

 

To ensure we handle all requests in the same way, the university has established public records request coordinators for each campus. The primary contact for the Knoxville campus is Charles Primm in the Office of Media and Internal Relations.

 

Requests, either written or verbal, for documents that are outside your department's normal business or academic transactions should be referred to Charles Primm at 865-974-2225 or charles.primm@tennessee.edu.

 


WordStat by Provalis Research, Inc.

What is it? WordStat is a supplemental program that works with either QDA Miner or Stata to perform content analysis on text data. This process is also known as text mining. You may create your own categorization dictionaries within WordStat or import pre-existing subject dictionaries. It can also extract topics automatically using latent semantic analysis. WordStat provides many of the same types of analyses as QDA Miner such as co-occurrence analysis and analyzing text categories by other variables such as age or gender. WordStat can only be started from within QDA Miner or Stata.

 

What can I use it for? Students, faculty, and staff can use WordStat for university-related academic or administrative purposes. Use that benefits outside organizations requires the purchase of a commercial license.

 

Where can I run it? WordStat is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs and Macs. The download and installation instructions are available at the OIT Software Download web page. It is also available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and in the OIT public computer lab. There is no simultaneous user limit for WordStat.

 

How can I learn it? OIT offers workshops on WordStat each semester, and you can schedule a one-on-one tutorial by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900. Tutorials are also available online at the company’s web page for tutorials. There are also several thousand tutorials available in a variety of languages on YouTube.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for this software. For assistance, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Workshops for November 6 – 11, 2017

Adobe

Adobe Photoshop 1 (Selections and Manipulations), November 7, 9:40 am – 11:40 am

Adobe Photoshop 2 (Layers, Frames, and Edges), November 9, 9:40 am – 11:40 am

Spark, November 8, 10:10 am – 11:10 am

 

Microsoft

Microsoft Excel 2 (Forms, Charts, and Macros), November 10, 9:05 am – 11:0 am

 

Research

Analysis of Clinical Trials, November 8, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

ArcGIS Online Tools: Adding spatial context, data and maps to research, November 9, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

 

Other

Social Media, LinkedIn, and Your Resume, November 10, 10:00 am – 11:00 am

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


How to Guard Against Phishing

According to Verizon's 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report, the education sector saw a rise in social engineering–based attacks. Students, staff, and faculty all suffered losses when personal data and research were disclosed to unauthorized parties. Phishing played a part in more than 40% of these breaches. Knowing what you're up against can help you be more secure. Here are a few things you can do to guard against phishing attacks:

 

  • Limit what you share online. The less you share about yourself, the smaller the target you are for a phishing attack. Cybercriminals use the information you post online to learn how to gain your trust.
  • Protect your credentials. No legitimate company or organization will ask for your username and password or other personal information via e-mail. Your school definitely won't.
  • Beware of attachments. E-mail attachments are the most common vector for malicious software. When you get a message with an attachment, delete it—unless you are expecting it and are absolutely certain it is legitimate.
  • Confirm identities. Phishing messages can look official. Cybercriminals steal organization and company identities, including logos and URLs that are close to the links they're trying to imitate. There's nothing to stop them from impersonating schools, financial institutions, retailers, and a wide range of other service providers.
  • Trust your instincts. If you get a suspicious message that claims to be from an agency or service provider, use your browser to manually locate the organization online and contact them via their website, e-mail, or telephone number.
  • Check the sender. Check the sender's e-mail address. Any correspondence from an organization should come from an organizational e-mail address. A notice from your college or university is unlikely to come from YourIThelpdesk@utk.yahoo.com.
  • Take your time. If a message states that you must act immediately or lose access, do not comply. Phishing attempts frequently threaten a loss of service unless you do something. Cybercriminals want you to react without thinking; an urgent call to action makes you more likely to cooperate.
  • Don't click links in suspicious messages. If you don't trust the e-mail (or text message), don't trust the links in it either. Beware of links that are hidden by URL shorteners or text like "Click Here." They may link to a phishing site or a form designed to steal your username and password.

 

Article Reference: https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2017/9/october-2018-dont-let-a-phishing-scam-reel-you-in

 


To Join/Leave the IT Weekly (http://listserv.utk.edu/archives/itweekly.html)

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Archive now available

 

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October 27
[ITWEEKLY] Update: IT Weekly, October 27, 2017

Good afternoon,

 

The dates for the Getting to Know Cynap sessions are Wednesday, November 1 and Thursday, November 2 from 9 am – 5 pm.  If you have questions about Cynap, call the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 

We hope to see you there!

Rose Parker

 

From: Reeves Jr, Joel E [mailto:joel.reeves@UTK.EDU]
Sent: October 27, 2017 2:40 PM
To: ITWEEKLY@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU
Subject: [ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 27, 2017

 

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

October 27, 2017

 

Party like it’s 1987!

This week we celebrated the 30th anniversary of the renovation of the John C. Hodges Library.  We displayed 1980’s and early 1990’s era technology and loved hearing the stories from faculty, staff, and students about how they used the technology on display.

 

OIT staff helped out by bringing in memorabilia from their personal collection!  Surprisingly, all of the equipment was in working order.

 

Think back to the 80’s… do you remember recording your favorite movie on your VCR or pulling the phone into another room, so you had privacy?  At UT, students used dumb terminals which connected to the mainframe. In 1987, we opened the first true ‘Mac’ lab in HSS. Today, we have approximately 400 OIT lab computers available and wireless in most buildings on campus and several outdoor spaces.  We are more connected than ever with laptops, smartphones, and tablets.

 

Can you identify any of these items on display?

 

 

1.       Computer Flowchart.  Today we use software, such as Visio, to diagram and flowchart our processes.  Back in the 80s, it was a manual process of putting pen to paper when using this flowchart stencil

2.      Mac Classic. Today, you are familiar with the modern all-in-one iMac.  In 1990, Apple introduced the Macintosh Classic, a personal computer designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer, Inc.  It was the first Macintosh to sell for less than $1,000.

3.      Commodore 128. Today, you are familiar with the personal computer brands Dell, HP, and Lenovo.  In the early 80s, Commodore created some of the first general personal computers.  In 1984, they released the 8-bit Commodore 128, the last Commodore created; after this, they would produce only 16/32 Bit Amiga’s and IBM PC clones.  

 


Windows 10 Fall Creator Update is here

Earlier this month, Microsoft released a major update to Windows 10, the Fall Creators Build, which will be installed on your computer in the coming weeks.  This update is much larger than the standard updates, similar to the Service Packs of earlier versions of Windows.  You should expect minor changes in the appearance of Windows once the update has been installed, however, this update should have no effect on any programs or files stored on your computer. Check out Microsoft’s website for more information.

 

Windows Insiders rated the top new features in Windows 10 Fall Creator Build.

o   PDFs in Edge. Fill in PDF-based forms within Microsoft Edge and make notes directly on PDFs.

o   Better storage management. With Windows 10 Creators Update, we added the ability to remove files you don't need using Storage Sense automatically. Now, you can also choose to have files in your Downloads folder automatically deleted as well.

 

Other notable improvements include:

One Drive Files on Demand. Access your files from the cloud in File Explorer without downloading and using storage space on your device. Stay tuned next week for more information!

Ransomware protections. Windows Defender Antivirus now has specific safeguards against malicious apps and threats like WannaCry.

Currency converter in Calculator. This top feature request even works offline when you’re traveling internationally.

 

We have performed limited testing to date, but we do not anticipate any major problems. This release is an automatic update, to be scheduled by Microsoft. Because of the size of this update, it will take a significant amount of time to install.  If you need assistance or encounter any issues during the update, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900 and ask for Desktop Support to arrange an appointment.

 


Get to Know Cynap

Curious about the Cynap technology in your classroom?  Want to learn more?

OIT will be offering one-hour consultation/training sessions in one convenient location.  No need to RSVP, just come in!

 

November 1 and 2

Practice Presentation Room, 220E The Commons in Hodges Library

Come by at the top of the hour between 9 am – 5 pm
The last session will begin at 4 pm. 

 


The SAS Statistical Analysis System

SAS is software for statistical analysis. Its programming language is one of the most widely used in the field of data science. SAS Studio allows you to edit SAS programs, or use a menu-based system to generate SAS code and analyze data.

 

The next series of SAS Studio workshops will be offered on Thursday, November 2, Multi-level Regression Models, and Wednesday, November 8, Analysis of Clinical Trails, in 520 Greve Hall.

 

Sign up online for Analysis of Clinical Trials and Multi-level Regression Models in SAS Proc Mixed.  If you are unable to attend these sessions and want to learn more about SAS, check out the online video tutorials offered by The SAS Institute. YouTube.com also has thousands SAS training videos covering a wide range of topics; videos are in English and most other popular languages.

 

OIT’s Research Computing Support group offers walk-in support for SAS and statistical analysis in general following this schedule. You can also make an appointment with one of our full-time statisticians by calling the HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Workshops for October 30 – November 3, 2017

Adobe

Adobe Muse (Basics), October 30, 10:10 am – 11:40 am

 

Microsoft

Microsoft Excel 3 (Advanced Features), October 30, 2:30 pm – 4:25 pm

 

Research

Multi-level Regression Models in SAS Proc Mixed, November 2, 10:00 am-noon.

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


Steps for Staying Secure in These Scary Times

As technology gains a more important role in our lives, it also grows in complexity. Given how quickly technology changes, keeping up with security advice can be confusing. It seems like there is always new guidance on what you should or should not be doing. However, while the details of how to stay secure may change over time, there are fundamental things you can always do to protect yourself. Regardless of what technology you are using or where you are using it, we recommend the following four key steps. 

 

What Can I Do?

You: Attackers have learned that the easiest way to bypass even the most advanced security technology is by attacking you. If they want your password, credit card, or personal data, the easiest thing for them to do is to trick you into giving them this information. For example, they can call you pretending to be Microsoft tech support and claim that your computer is infected, when in reality they are just cyber criminals that want you to give them access to your computer. Perhaps they will send you an email explaining that your package could not be delivered and ask you to click on a link to confirm your mailing address, when in reality they are tricking you into visiting a malicious website that will hack into your computer. This is how attacks such as Ransomware work. Ultimately, the greatest defense against attackers is you. Be suspicious. By using common sense, you can spot and stop most attacks.

 

Passwords: The next step to protecting yourself involves using a strong, unique password for each of your devices and online accounts. The key words here are strong and unique. A strong password means one that cannot be easily guessed by hackers or by their automated programs. Tired of complex passwords that are hard to remember and difficult to type? Try using a passphrase instead. Instead of a single word, use a series of words that is easy to remember, such as “Where is my coffee?” The longer your passphrase is, the stronger. A unique password means using a different password for each device and online account. This way, if one password is compromised, all of your other accounts and devices are still safe. Can’t remember all those strong, unique passwords? Don’t worry, neither can we. That is why we recommend you use a password manager, which is a specialized application for your smartphone or computer that securely stores all of your passwords in an encrypted format.

 

Updates/Patches: Make sure your computers, mobile devices, apps, and anything else connected to the Internet are running the latest software versions. Cyber criminals are constantly looking for new vulnerabilities in the software your devices use. When they discover vulnerabilities, they use special programs to exploit them and hack into the devices you are using. Meanwhile, the companies that created the software for these devices are hard at work fixing them by releasing updates. By ensuring your computers and mobile devices install these updates, you make it much harder for someone to hack you. If your operating systems or devices are old and no longer supported with security updates, we recommend you replace them with new ones that are.

 

Backups: Sometimes, no matter how careful you are, you may be hacked. If that is the case, often your only option to ensure your computer or mobile device is free of malware is to fully wipe it and rebuild it from scratch. The attacker might even prevent you from accessing your personal files, photos, and other information stored on the hacked system. Often the only way to restore all of your personal information is from backups. 

 

As a reminder, OIT will post email scams to the Recent Email Scams tab within the OIT System Status Center.  You can check this site to see if a suspicious email has already been reported.  If you have concerns about a specific email, you may report the email to OIT via abuse@utk.edu or contact the OIT HelpDesk.

 


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October 27
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 27, 2017

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter 

October 27, 2017

 

Party like it’s 1987!

This week we celebrated the 30th anniversary of the renovation of the John C. Hodges Library.  We displayed 1980’s and early 1990’s era technology and loved hearing the stories from faculty, staff, and students about how they used the technology on display.

 

OIT staff helped out by bringing in memorabilia from their personal collection!  Surprisingly, all of the equipment was in working order.

 

Think back to the 80’s… do you remember recording your favorite movie on your VCR or pulling the phone into another room, so you had privacy?  At UT, students used dumb terminals which connected to the mainframe. In 1987, we opened the first true ‘Mac’ lab in HSS. Today, we have approximately 400 OIT lab computers available and wireless in most buildings on campus and several outdoor spaces.  We are more connected than ever with laptops, smartphones, and tablets.

 

Can you identify any of these items on display?

 

 

 

1.      Computer Flowchart.  Today we use software, such as Visio, to diagram and flowchart our processes.  Back in the 80s, it was a manual process of putting pen to paper when using this flowchart stencil

2.     Mac Classic. Today, you are familiar with the modern all-in-one iMac.  In 1990, Apple introduced the Macintosh Classic, a personal computer designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer, Inc.  It was the first Macintosh to sell for less than $1,000.

3.     Commodore 128. Today, you are familiar with the personal computer brands Dell, HP, and Lenovo.  In the early 80s, Commodore created some of the first general personal computers.  In 1984, they released the 8-bit Commodore 128, the last Commodore created; after this, they would produce only 16/32 Bit Amiga’s and IBM PC clones.  

 


 

Windows 10 Fall Creator Update is here

Earlier this month, Microsoft released a major update to Windows 10, the Fall Creators Build, which will be installed on your computer in the coming weeks.  This update is much larger than the standard updates, similar to the Service Packs of earlier versions of Windows.  You should expect minor changes in the appearance of Windows once the update has been installed, however, this update should have no effect on any programs or files stored on your computer. Check out Microsoft’s website for more information.

 

Windows Insiders rated the top new features in Windows 10 Fall Creator Build.

o   PDFs in Edge. Fill in PDF-based forms within Microsoft Edge and make notes directly on PDFs.

o   Better storage management. With Windows 10 Creators Update, we added the ability to remove files you don't need using Storage Sense automatically. Now, you can also choose to have files in your Downloads folder automatically deleted as well.

 

Other notable improvements include:

One Drive Files on Demand. Access your files from the cloud in File Explorer without downloading and using storage space on your device. Stay tuned next week for more information!

Ransomware protections. Windows Defender Antivirus now has specific safeguards against malicious apps and threats like WannaCry.

Currency converter in Calculator. This top feature request even works offline when you’re traveling internationally.

 

We have performed limited testing to date, but we do not anticipate any major problems. This release is an automatic update, to be scheduled by Microsoft. Because of the size of this update, it will take a significant amount of time to install.  If you need assistance or encounter any issues during the update, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900 and ask for Desktop Support to arrange an appointment.

 


 

Get to Know Cynap

Curious about the Cynap technology in your classroom?  Want to learn more?

OIT will be offering one-hour consultation/training sessions in one convenient location.  No need to RSVP, just come in!

 

November 1 and 2

Practice Presentation Room, 220E The Commons in Hodges Library

Come by at the top of the hour between 9 am – 5 pm
The last session will begin at 4 pm. 

 


 

The SAS Statistical Analysis System

SAS is software for statistical analysis. Its programming language is one of the most widely used in the field of data science. SAS Studio allows you to edit SAS programs, or use a menu-based system to generate SAS code and analyze data.

 

The next series of SAS Studio workshops will be offered on Thursday, November 2, Multi-level Regression Models, and Wednesday, November 8, Analysis of Clinical Trails, in 520 Greve Hall.

 

Sign up online for Analysis of Clinical Trials and Multi-level Regression Models in SAS Proc Mixed.  If you are unable to attend these sessions and want to learn more about SAS, check out the online video tutorials offered by The SAS Institute. YouTube.com also has thousands SAS training videos covering a wide range of topics; videos are in English and most other popular languages.

 

OIT’s Research Computing Support group offers walk-in support for SAS and statistical analysis in general following this schedule. You can also make an appointment with one of our full-time statisticians by calling the HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


 

Workshops for October 30 – November 3, 2017

Adobe

Adobe Muse (Basics), October 30, 10:10 am – 11:40 am

 

Microsoft

Microsoft Excel 3 (Advanced Features), October 30, 2:30 pm – 4:25 pm

 

Research

Multi-level Regression Models in SAS Proc Mixed, November 2, 10:00 am-noon.

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


 

Steps for Staying Secure in These Scary Times

As technology gains a more important role in our lives, it also grows in complexity. Given how quickly technology changes, keeping up with security advice can be confusing. It seems like there is always new guidance on what you should or should not be doing. However, while the details of how to stay secure may change over time, there are fundamental things you can always do to protect yourself. Regardless of what technology you are using or where you are using it, we recommend the following four key steps. 

 

What Can I Do?

You: Attackers have learned that the easiest way to bypass even the most advanced security technology is by attacking you. If they want your password, credit card, or personal data, the easiest thing for them to do is to trick you into giving them this information. For example, they can call you pretending to be Microsoft tech support and claim that your computer is infected, when in reality they are just cyber criminals that want you to give them access to your computer. Perhaps they will send you an email explaining that your package could not be delivered and ask you to click on a link to confirm your mailing address, when in reality they are tricking you into visiting a malicious website that will hack into your computer. This is how attacks such as Ransomware work. Ultimately, the greatest defense against attackers is you. Be suspicious. By using common sense, you can spot and stop most attacks.

 

Passwords: The next step to protecting yourself involves using a strong, unique password for each of your devices and online accounts. The key words here are strong and unique. A strong password means one that cannot be easily guessed by hackers or by their automated programs. Tired of complex passwords that are hard to remember and difficult to type? Try using a passphrase instead. Instead of a single word, use a series of words that is easy to remember, such as “Where is my coffee?” The longer your passphrase is, the stronger. A unique password means using a different password for each device and online account. This way, if one password is compromised, all of your other accounts and devices are still safe. Can’t remember all those strong, unique passwords? Don’t worry, neither can we. That is why we recommend you use a password manager, which is a specialized application for your smartphone or computer that securely stores all of your passwords in an encrypted format.

 

Updates/Patches: Make sure your computers, mobile devices, apps, and anything else connected to the Internet are running the latest software versions. Cyber criminals are constantly looking for new vulnerabilities in the software your devices use. When they discover vulnerabilities, they use special programs to exploit them and hack into the devices you are using. Meanwhile, the companies that created the software for these devices are hard at work fixing them by releasing updates. By ensuring your computers and mobile devices install these updates, you make it much harder for someone to hack you. If your operating systems or devices are old and no longer supported with security updates, we recommend you replace them with new ones that are.

 

Backups: Sometimes, no matter how careful you are, you may be hacked. If that is the case, often your only option to ensure your computer or mobile device is free of malware is to fully wipe it and rebuild it from scratch. The attacker might even prevent you from accessing your personal files, photos, and other information stored on the hacked system. Often the only way to restore all of your personal information is from backups. 

 

As a reminder, OIT will post email scams to the Recent Email Scams tab within the OIT System Status Center.  You can check this site to see if a suspicious email has already been reported.  If you have concerns about a specific email, you may report the email to OIT via abuse@utk.edu or contact the OIT HelpDesk.

 


 

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October 20
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 20, 217

 

Title: OIT Weekly at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Description: Office of Information Technology's weekly newsletter

October 20, 2017

 

OIT Lab Upgrades Complete

Over the last few months, OIT Lab Services has been busy updating the public computer labs. New iMacs, Dell desktops, Dell laptops and Dell printers have been installed around campus. The iMacs are running Mac OS Sierra, and the Dell computers are running Windows 10.  All UT faculty, staff and students can use these computers by logging in with your NetID and password.  Additional information about the software available in the labs and printing in the labs is available on the OIT website

Contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900 with any questions.

 

iMacs

Hodges Library, Commons, north and south
Natalie L. Haslam Music Center, George F. Devine Music Library, room G04
Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library

 

Dell Desktops

Hodges Library, Miles Reading Room, room 135
Hodges Library, Graduate Lab, room 642
John D. Tickle, room 403

Natalie L. Haslam Music Center, George F. Devine Music Library, room G04

Dell Laptops

Hodges Library, Commons south
Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library

 

Printers

Art Lab, room 345

Hodges Library, Commons, north and south

Hodges Library, Miles Reading Room, room 135
Hodges Library, Graduate Lab, room 642
Hodges Library, room 245 (behind Starbucks)
John D. Tickle, room 403

Natalie L. Haslam Music Center, George F. Devine Music Library, room G04
Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library


Learn More About Digital Humanities

Join us on Wednesday, October 25, 12:20 pm to 1:10 pm in Hodges Library 220E to learn about Digital Humanities, what instructors are doing in the field, and discuss the future of Digital Humanities at UTK.

Bring your lunch and a colleague to attend the October Instructional Technology Community of Practice (ITCoP) panel discussion.  The presenters include Alex Bentley and Mark Freeman, Anthropology; Jill Fennel, GA-English; Josh Jeffrey, GA-History; and Nichole Proctor, Undergraduate Research Intern-Psychology.

 
Digital Humanities involves bringing computational technology to the study and teaching of the humanities. It ranges from using computers to analyze verbal patterns in text, to using GIS mapping on historical data. Digital humanists curate online collections of primary texts, use data visualization tools to render information in ways that produce new insights, and create innovative pedagogical environments for their students. It enriches both scholarship and teaching.

Visit the ITCoP website for more information.

 


Office 365: Upcoming Change to Email

Microsoft is looking to combat phishing by making a minor change to their email service.  This change will not affect the majority of our faculty, staff, and students, however, if you are sending automated emails from your server, printer, or copier, you may want to verify your settings.

 

On November 9, Microsoft will enforce the use of a valid From: address.  Emails without a valid From address will be sent to the recipient’s Junk Email or Deleted Items folders.  One technique phishers use is to send messages that have values for the From: address that are not compliant with industry standards or left blank.

 

In general, the following formats for the From: address are valid:

<display name> email address

Email address

 

Examples:

<OIT HelpDesk> help@utk.edu

help@utk.edu

 

If you have a server or device that is sending email without a valid From: address, please update this information before November 9th to prevent an interruption in email.

 

If you are using Outlook, Outlook on the Web, or email on your mobile device, you will not be affected by this change.  If you are sending email “on behalf of” someone in your department, you will also not be affected by this change.

 

Additional information about this change is available on Microsoft’s website.

 


Amos for Windows by SPSS, an IBM company

What is it? Amos (Analysis of Moment Structures) analyzes Structural Equations Models (SEM) by either drawing a path diagram or via a command language. These models are also known as LISREL models, confirmatory factor analysis, analysis of covariance structures, path analysis, or causal modeling.

 

Where can I run it? Amos is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs. The download and installation instructions are at the OIT software download page. For UTK, Amos is also available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and the computers in the OIT public computer labs. There is no simultaneous user limit for Amos.

 

How can I learn it? You can schedule a one-on-one tutorial anytime by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900. A tutorial is also provided as part of the Amos Help files.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for this software. For assistance, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Workshops for October 23 - 27, 2017

Instructor

ePortfolios for Developing and Assessing Student Professional Competencies, October 27,  10:10 am – 12:10 pm

 

Microsoft

Microsoft Excel 2 (Forms, Charts, and Macros), October 23, 2:30 pm – 4:25 pm

 

Web

Introduction to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), October 23, 10:10 am – 11:40 am

Advanced Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), October 25, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


Cybersecurity and Research

Grant-funded research projects are exciting. Imagine being a campus researcher leading such a project: you've defined a problem, spent hours — including evenings and weekends — writing a grant, and you've been selected from a competitive field to receive the award. Now you have a limited amount of time to build your team, execute your plan, and reach your research goal.

 

One common factor among scientists, no matter which discipline they belong to or how complex the project may be, is the use of computing resources. Researchers use computers for simulations, data capture, storage, sharing, and analysis, as well as project management, collaboration, and the more utilitarian tasks like e-mailing, scheduling, and maintaining websites. Using computing resources inevitably come cybersecurity concerns. Even if the use of computer resources is minimal, threats such as ransomware and usurpation of your computers for a BOTNET or SPAM can seriously impede your research. Some projects will have a clear challenge around regulated data (e.g., HIPAA for certain types of health information and defense regulations for certain types of classified data), but cybersecurity requirements may be less clear.

 

There are specific cybersecurity challenges for grant-funded science projects, and the Information Security community can help resolve those challenges.

 

Grant-funded science projects face a number of unique challenges related to cybersecurity:

·             Projects are rarely large enough to warrant hiring personnel dedicated to information security.

·             The limited lifetime of a project makes them laser-focused (sometimes literally!) on their scientific goals.

·             Research can require specialized computing infrastructure that is difficult to update and challenges common information security practices.

·             There is a common misunderstanding that an open research project that doesn't have confidentiality requirements has no cybersecurity concerns.

·             Scientists may be offered (often contradictory) information security advice, leaving them feeling anxious, overwhelmed, and uncertain about how to begin addressing cybersecurity issues with respect to their research projects and data.

 

Four lessons in how the information technology community can work with researchers:

 

1.           LISTEN - IT and research staff must strive to communicate and bridge the cultural gap between their communities. To effectively support research, IT staff must have a clear understanding of the concerns of the research staff about the integrity of their research project. Mapping those concerns to cybersecurity risks is the end goal.

2.          RECOGNIZE THE DIFFERENCE - IT controls (e.g., firewall policies) that make sense for administrative computing can hinder the collaboration required by a research project that spans multiple organizations. A research-centric approach such as a science DMZ may be one way to bridge the gap between administrative and research computing.

3.          PRIORITIZE - Research projects are typically time-sensitive. Clear communication between the IT practitioners and the research staff is important when identifying where cybersecurity is most critical. This promotes the prioritization of recommended actions that will deliver the most bang for the buck in a short amount of time.

4.          NEVER ASSUME - Research staff may assume that a level of cybersecurity protections (controls) exist. CAUTION! Never assume; ASK. You may assume a firewall exists and is actively protecting your data when the very opposite may be the case.

 

When your project depends on information technology resources at UTK, involve OIT as EARLY as possible; start the conversation early to ensure that your requirements are known, IT risks are identified and prioritized.

 

Engaging OIT starts with a call to HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


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October 13
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 13, 2017

 

Title: OIT Weekly - Description: Banner with OIT Weekly newsletter title.

October 13, 2017

 

Announcing Google Drive Stream

On September 26, 2017, Google officially released their new Google Drive File Stream app to G-Suite customers. Drive File Stream is a new desktop application that allows you to quickly access all of your Google Drive files on demand, directly from your computer without losing precious drive space.

 

What are the new features for Google Drive File Stream?

  • With Drive File Stream, you can:
  • Quickly see all your Google Drive files in Finder/Explorer (including Team Drives).
  • Browse and organize Google Drive files without downloading all of them to your computer.
  • Choose which files or folders you'd like to make available offline.
  • Open files in common apps like Microsoft Office and Adobe Photoshop.

 

How much storage do I have for my Drive files?

UTK Google Accounts have unlimited storage.

 

What if I’m using the current Google Drive sync application?

With this launch, Google Drive for Mac/PC is officially deprecated. It will no longer be supported by Google starting on December 11th, 2017, and it will shut down completely on March 12th, 2018. As an alternative to or in addition to installing Drive File Stream, you can upgrade to the new version of Drive for Mac/PC, called Backup and Sync.

 

Where can I get more information?

To get started with Drive, visit the Drive Help Center. Please note that to see this page and install the new app, you must log into Google with your UT Google Account username and password.

 

For more information, visit the Knowledge Base, or contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Office 365: Changes coming to Power BI

Have you created reports and shared them through Power BI? Are you getting a pop-up for the trial version of Power BI Pro? Are you looking for a new way to run reports and share them with your colleagues?

 

Microsoft has recently changed the licensing model for Power BI, a powerful reporting tool available in Office 365. Included in our contract is Power BI Free, which includes Power BI for personal use and does not allow you to share reports or view shared reports. These features are available in Power BI Pro and Power BI Premium.

 

Microsoft is currently offering a two-month trial of Power BI Pro. Once the trial period is complete, you must purchase Power BI Pro to continue to use the full feature set. Contact the OIT HelpDesk to place your order for Power BI Pro, $23/year/user.

If you have created reports for your department, you may want to consider purchasing licenses for the individuals with whom you will be sharing the reports.

 

Summary of PowerBI version s:

Power BI Free

Includes the ability to use the Power BI Service for personal use. No collaboration or sharing options.

Power BI Pro

Includes Power BI Free features + ability to share and collaborate with colleagues in the Power BI Service. Includes additional features such as usage metrics.

Power BI Premium

Complements Power BI Pro features by supporting higher data limits, enhanced performance, and ability to distribute to report consumers with Power BI Free licensing.  On-premises report publishing. APIs for custom application integration.

 

If you have any questions, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900

 


Help UT Understand Your Web Survey Software Needs

The current university contract for centrally funded web survey software (Qualtrics) is due for renewal in Spring 2018. Given that web survey software is widely used by faculty, staff, and students, UT is interested in input from members of the campus community.

 

We would like to know what features are important to your data collection needs, as well as what types of data you collect. 

 

Current users of web survey software at UT received an email containing a link to a survey this week. If you did not receive an email and would like to provide feedback on your web survey needs, you can do so at http://tiny.utk.edu/websurveyneeds. The survey should take 10-15 minutes to complete. We have included an extensive list of features culled from many web survey software providers. Progress will not be saved so you will need to complete the survey in one session. The survey will close 5pm Friday, October 21. If you have questions, please contact the HelpDesk at (865) 974-9900.

 


Learn More about Creating Websites

Have you ever wondered what it would take to develop a website? The OIT training team offers a variety of workshops to get you moving in the right direction. In our Overview of Web Development, you will learn about the broad range of ways you can interact with the world wide web to create websites. Topics range from WordPress and blogging to HTML, web hosting, and everything in between.

 

After the overview course, you will have the knowledge you need to determine if you want to engage in the world of coding or take a more relaxed approach using a website builder like Muse. We offer a basic HTML class as well as two levels of Cascading Style Sheets to help you get started. Additionally, for those less inclined toward coding, we offer a 2-hour workshop on using Adobe Muse.

 

Our next workshop series starts on October 16. Visit the OIT Workshop Registration and search for “HTML” to register.

 

Are the workshops at a time that doesn’t work for you? Are you looking for material beyond what is covered in the basic classes? Check out this Lynda video on web design and development or explore the more than 30 hours of videos on related topics.

 


WordStat by Provalis Research, Inc.

What is it? WordStat is a supplemental program that works with either QDA Miner or Stata to perform content analysis on text data. This process is also known as text mining. You may create your own categorization dictionaries within WordStat or import pre-existing subject dictionaries. It can also extract topics automatically using latent semantic analysis. WordStat provides many of the same types of analyses as QDA Miner such as co-occurrence analysis and analyzing text categories by other variables such as age or gender. WordStat can only be started from within QDA Miner or Stata.

 

What can I use if for? Students, faculty, and staff can use WordStat for university-related academic or administrative purposes. Use that benefits outside organizations requires the purchase of a commercial license.

 

Where can I run it? WordStat is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs and Macs. The download and installation instructions are available at the OIT Software Download web page. It is also available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and on the computers in the OIT public computer labs. There is no simultaneous user limit for WordStat.

 

How can I learn it? OIT offers workshops on WordStat each semester, and you can schedule a one-on-one tutorial by calling the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900. Tutorials are also available online at the company’s web page for tutorials.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Full Support for this software. For assistance, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Workshops for October 16 - 20, 2017

Instructor

BYOD with WolfVision Cynap, October 18, 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Mobile Learning Make and Take, October 18, 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Teaching in a Technology Enhanced Classroom (TEC) 1, October 18, 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Video Captioning Basics, October 19, 9:40 am – 10:55 am

 

Microsoft

Microsoft Excel 1 (Worksheet Basics), October 16, 2:30 pm – 4:25 pm

 

Social Media

Social Media, LinkedIn, and Your Resume, October 2, 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

 

Web

Overview of Web Development, October 16, 10:10am - 11:40am

HTML Fundamentals, October 18, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm

 

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


Social Engineering is Spooky!

Social engineering is a psychological attack where an attacker tricks you into doing something you should not do. The concept of social engineering is not new; it has existed for thousands of years. Think of scammers or con artists, it is the very same idea. What makes today’s technology so much more effective for cyber attackers is you cannot physically see them; they can easily pretend to be anything or anyone they want and target millions of people around the world, including you. In addition, social engineering attacks can bypass many security technologies. The simplest way to understand how these attacks work and protect yourself from them is to take a look at two real-world examples.

 

You receive a phone call from someone claiming to be from a computer support company, the OIT HelpDesk, or even Microsoft Tech Support. The caller explains that your computer is actively scanning the Internet. They believe it is infected and have been tasked with helping you secure your computer. Once they have tricked you into believing your computer is infected, they pressure you into buying their security software or giving them remote access to your computer so they can fix it. However, the software they are selling is actually a malicious program. If you purchase and install it, not only have they fooled you into infecting your computer, but you just paid them to do it. If you give them remote access to your computer, they are going to take it over, steal your data, or use it for their bidding.

Keep in mind, social engineering attacks like these are not limited to phone calls or email; they can happen in any form, including text messages on your phone, over social media, or even in person. The key is to know what to look out for--you are your own best defense.

 

Stopping Social Engineering Attacks

·         Someone asking for information they should not have access to or should already know, such as your account numbers.

·         Someone asking for your password. No legitimate organization will ever ask you for that.

·         Someone pressuring you to bypass or ignore security processes or procedures you are expected to follow at work.

·         Something too good to be true. For example, you are notified you won the lottery or an iPad, even though you never even entered the lottery.

·         You receive an odd email from a friend or coworker containing wording that does not sound like it is really them. A cyber attacker may have hacked into their account and is attempting to trick you. To protect yourself, verify such requests by reaching out to your friend using a different communications method, such as in person or over the phone.

·         If you suspect someone is trying to trick or fool you, do not communicate with the person anymore. If the attack is work related, be sure to report it to your help desk or information security team right away. Remember, common sense is often your best defense.

 


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October 06
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, October 6, 2017

 

Title: OIT Weekly - Description: Banner with OIT Weekly newsletter title

October 6, 2017

 

Upcoming Security Change to Google Chrome Web Browser

To push forward improvements in web browser security, the Google Chrome web browser will begin displaying a "Not secure" warning in the address bar when visiting a web page that hasn't been secured via SSL. In other words, any web page that is only HTTP:// instead of HTTPS://.

 

What does this mean for you? If you are using Chrome and visit a site that does not begin with HTTPS, you will experience a warning in the address bar that says that this page is not secure. This warning is especially important to notice when visiting sites that ask for personal information or present a login screen.

 

More information about the change, technical details, and illustrated examples are in the following Chromium blog post, https://blog.chromium.org/2017/04/next-steps-toward-more-connection.html.

 


macOS High Sierra, version 10.13, now available

Fall is here, and it’s that time again!  No, not just Football Time in Tennessee, but time for Apple to release its latest operating system, macOS High Sierra. But don’t push that upgrade button just yet! While you may be tempted to upgrade, be cautious and upgrade your operating system only after you have verified that your favorite applications will work with the newer OS. Some vendors have cautioned against upgrading due to incompatibilities with their software, such as with Adobe Illustrator and InDesign, Autodesk AutoCAD 2017, etc. Experience indicates that the most prudent course would be to bide your time for a few months until Apple releases the first patch and vendors have an opportunity to correct incompatibilities between their products and High Sierra. OIT’s recommendation is always to proceed with caution when upgrading, however, if you do go forward, please be sure to back up your data and locate any media and license codes for your applications before initiating an upgrade.

 

If you have any questions or need assistance, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call (865) 974-9900.

 


SMART Notebook Expires October 15

If you use SMART Notebook, you may have noticed that your software is expiring on October 15, 2017. Once the software expires, it will change to Limited Mode. Limited mode means that some of the premium features, like Lesson Recorder or SMART lab and response, will be turned off. You’ll still be able to annotate your PowerPoint in your classroom. You’ll notice a watermark when looking at your Notebook, but this watermark will disappear when you connect to the SMARTboard in your classroom.

 

Many classrooms have Epson interactive projectors, which have replaced SMARTboards. These projectors do not require software to use them for annotation. Contact the OIT HelpDesk to request a consultation for training on the technology available in your classroom.

 


Akindi: A Scantron Alternative – Early Feedback

Earlier this semester we introduced, Akindi, a web-based assessment system that automates the creation and grading of multiple choice examinations. Akinidi is accessible through Canvas and uses your departmental copy machine to scan and score bubble-forms.

 

Early feedback about Akindi has been very positive.

·        Having now used Akindi on my students' responses from their midterm last Friday, I can report that I rather liked the system. Everything went smoothly regarding scanning (on our dept copier in bulk using the paper feeder), uploading, and having the grades upload directly to Canvas. I also really like the statistics Akindi calculates on the exam, with metrics for probable question quality as well as class summaries.

·        Oh boy. I LOVED IT. So easy to use for my class..., and there are a lot of advantages (can change the key and rerun easily, point weighting, multiple answers per questions) that are not available with scantrons.

 

With Akindi, you can:

·        Sync with your Canvas class roster to create personalized answer sheets

·        Print your answer sheets on plain paper from any printer

·        Sort multiple sections and test versions electronically after scanning rather than physically doing so beforehand

·        Scan the completed answer sheets on any document scanner

·        Upload a pdf of scanned forms or, if scanner has email capability, send the pdf directly to Akindi

·        Handle changes to the key, multiple correct answers, and differential item weighting online

·        Review student performance and item analysis results online

·        Sync the exam grades with your Canvas grade book and email students their grades

 

To start using Akindi, log on to your Canvas account, click “Launch Akindi” and watch the brief introductory video. More detailed training videos are available on their Getting Started web page. While using Akindi, a chat window is available for help directly from the company.

 

Visit the OIT website to learn more about Akindi and our traditional Scantron services or contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900 for assistance.

 


Stata MP by Stata Corp

What is it? Stata MP is a general purpose package for statistics, data management, and graphics. You can control it using its programming language or its graphical user interface. Stata is designed to be easily extendable, and there are many hundreds of free add-ons available for it in Internet repositories. Stata is particularly strong in time series, panel data, and the analysis of complex, non-random samples. Its data must fit into your computer’s main memory, limiting the amount of data it can handle.

 

What can I use it for? Students, faculty, and staff can use Stata for university-related academic or administrative purposes. Use that benefits outside organizations requires the purchase of a commercial license.

 

Where can I run it? Stata MP is available on OIT’s Apps@UT server and the computers in the OIT public computer labs. There is a 14 simultaneous user limit for Stata MP.

 

How can I learn it? To get started with Stata, you can watch the tutorials on the company’s YouTube training channel.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Minimal Support for Stata. However, there is a very active and helpful support group named StataList.

 

Anything else I should know? You can purchase Stata for your computer directly from the company. UT has “GradPlan” educational pricing. Don Bruce in CBER is the campus representative. Feel free to contact him with your questions at dbruce@utk.edu or 865-974-6088.

 


Workshops for October 9 - 13, 2017

Adobe

Creating Practice and Assessment Activities Using Adobe Captivate, October 10, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm

 

File Storage

Cloud Storage Options at UTK, October 11, 10:10am – 11:10am

 

Google

Google Forms, October 9, 10:10 am – 11:10 am

Google Sites, October 10, 9:40am – 11:40am

 

Research

Introduction to NVivo, October 11, 2:00pm – 4:00pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


Helping Others Secure Themselves

Many of us feel comfortable with technology, to include how to use it safely and securely. However, other friends or family members may not feel so comfortable. In fact, they may be confused, intimidated, or even scared by it.

 

Five Simple Steps

Here are five simple steps you can take to help others overcome those fears and securely make the most of today’s technology.

 

  1. Social engineering is a common technique used by cyber attackers to trick or fool people into doing something they should not do, such as sharing their password, infecting their computer, or sharing sensitive information. You can help others by explaining to them the most common clues of a social engineering attack, such as when someone creates a tremendous sense of urgency, when something is too good to be true, or when a cyber-attacker pretends to be someone you know, but their messages don’t sound like them.

 

  1. Strong passwords are key to protecting devices and any online accounts. Walk your family members through how to create strong passwords. We recommend passphrases, as they are the easiest to both type and remember.

 

  1. Patching. Keep the security patches on your operating systems and applications up-to-date. This is not only true for your computers and mobile devices, but anything connected to the Internet, such as gaming consoles, thermometers, or even lights or speakers. The simplest way to ensure all devices are current is to enable automatic updating whenever possible.

 

  1. Anti-Virus. People make mistakes. We sometimes click on or install things we probably should not, which could infect our systems. Anti-virus is designed to protect us from those mistakes. While anti-virus cannot stop all malware, it does help detect and stop the more common attacks. Also, many of today’s anti-virus solutions include other security technology, such as firewalls and browser protection.

 

  1. Backups. When all else fails, backups are often the only way you can recover from mistakes (like deleting the wrong files) or cyber-attacks (like ransomware). Make sure family and friends have an automated file backup system in place. Often, the simplest solutions are Cloud-based. They back up your devices hourly or whenever you make a change to a file. These solutions make it easy not only to back up data but to recover it.

 

Article Reference: https://securingthehuman.sans.org/newsletters/ouch/issues/OUCH-201710_en.pdf

 


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September 29
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, September 29, 2017

 

September 29, 2017

 

Scheduled Outage of OIT Services over Fall Break

The OIT Data Center located in the Kingston Pike Building will be unavailable from Oct 6, 5:00 PM EDT through Oct 9, 8:00 AM EDT while Facilities Services improves the electrical distribution system.  During this time, we do not expect an interruption to most services provided by OIT, however, some services will be impacted.

 

·         Internet access may be degraded during this event, and network service will be unavailable for the Kingston Pike Building, Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Joint Institute of Neutron Science, and Pro2Serv; as will telephone service in the Kingston Pike Building.

·         Access to UT Chattanooga, ORNL, Internet2, TransitRail, UT Martin, and ENA will be available through our other internet providers.

·         The network registration system will be available to view registered devices. However, new devices will not be able to register during the event, and changes cannot be made to existing entries.

·         MediaSite services for Digital Media Services, College of Business, and OIT Webcasting will be unavailable.

·         OIT backup services provided by TSM and Legato will also be unavailable.

·         The Newton cluster will be unavailable starting at noon on October 6.

·         Other OIT production systems will be available during this outage; however, many development and QA environments for those systems will be unavailable.

 

If you have any questions about this event, please contact the OIT HelpDesk.

 


Office 365: New App Launcher Coming Soon

Microsoft has announced the new app launcher will be available in the coming months.  The new app launcher is personalized and will help you open and switch between the apps you use most. On the main app launcher screen, you will see the apps that you most frequently use as well as the most common Office 365 apps, such as Outlook and Calendar.  You will also have access to an alphabetized list of all Office 365 apps.  These apps can be added to your main screen at any time.

 

Have you ever wondered what some of these apps do?  Microsoft is also introducing a new Office 365 gallery page, accessible from www.office.com, that will help you better understand the apps, tools, and services that are part of your Office 365 account.  The Office 365 gallery page will be available with the new app launcher.

 

If you have any questions or would like a sneak peek, check out Microsoft’s Video: Meet the new Office 365 app launcher

 


Update: Classification Survey

The Classification Survey initiative continues as we ask faculty, staff, and student employees using university computing equipment to complete a brief survey identifying the type of data stored, viewed, or processed on their university-owned equipment.

 

Instructions on how to classify your devices are available in the OIT Knowledge Base.

 

You can classify the devices you work on at classify.utk.edu.

 

Since January 23, 82.5% of university-owned devices have been classified; approximately 6,700 university-owned devices remain on the classification list.  If you have any questions or need assistance, please contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900.

 


SPSS Text Analytics for Surveys by SPSS, an IBM company

What is it? SPSS Text Analytics for Surveys is a linguistic package designed to help you categorize open-ended survey items. Its ability to differentiate positive from negative responses is quite helpful. It is limited to around 5,000 responses, one page or less in length.

 

What can I use it for? Students, faculty, and staff can use it for university-related academic or administrative purposes. Use that benefits outside organizations requires the purchase of a commercial license.

 

Where can I run it? SPSS Text Analysis for Surveys is available at no additional charge to faculty, staff and students at all UT campuses for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs. The download and installation instructions are available at the OIT Software Download web page.

 

How can I learn it? This package is easy to learn using the manual that is included with it.

 

Where can I get support? OIT offers Minimal Support for SPSS Text Analysis for Surveys.

 


Workshops for October 2 - 6, 2017

Accessibility

Overcoming Accessibility Barriers in Assessments, October 2, 2017, 10:10 am – 11:25 am

Overcoming Accessibility Barriers in Assessments, October 3, 2017, 9:40 am – 10:55 am

 

Adobe

Adobe Captivate 1 (Hands-On with Adobe Captivate:  Going Beyond PowerPoint), October 4, 2017, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm

 

Apple

Apple iMovie, October 2, 2017, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm

Apple GarageBand, October 3, 2017, 9:40 am – 11:40 am

 

Research

Overview of Research Software and Services, October 3, 2017, 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Introduction to MATLAB, October 4, 2017, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


Using Cloud Technologies Safely

The cloud is a service provider that stores and manages data for its customers. The advantage of using the cloud is that you can access your data from multiple devices and can share the data more easily with who you desire. The reason this service is known as “the cloud” is that you often do not know where your data is physically being stored. Examples of “the cloud” include Google Docs, Amazon cloud, and Apple iCloud.

 

The cloud has other advantages, but you must also take the proper steps in protecting yourself when selecting a cloud provider. For your work computer or work-related information, check with your supervisor to see if the cloud servers are allowed. If so, take into consideration a server’s security as the most important aspect. Be sure to understand how your data will get from your computer to the cloud and how your information will be stored in the cloud. Finally, make sure encryption secures the connection and understand who can decrypt your data.

 

If you have concerns or questions about “the cloud,” you should contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865- 974-9900. Also, check in at the OIT System Status Center as OIT posts email scams to the Recent Email Scams tab.

 

Remember, no one in OIT, the OIT HelpDesk, or any legitimate online entity will ever ask you for your password via email.

 


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September 22
[ITWEEKLY] IT Weekly, September 22, 2017

 

September 22, 2017

 

Fall 2017 Classroom Upgrades

Over the summer OIT’s IT Engineering Services team was hard at work upgrading the technology in several classrooms across campus.  Upgrades vary in each room but include new touchscreen panels, new projectors, and Wolfvision Cynap devices.

 

  • Art and Architecture: 109
  • Buehler: 472, 555
  • Communications: 208, 251, 317
  • Engineering and Science Annex: 233, 413
  • Jessie Harris: 114, 243, 244, 413, 414, 424, 425
  • Haslam Business: 102, 103, 104, 112, 113, 121, 124, 125, 130, 131, 132, 136
  • Haslam Music: G007, G009, G018, G022, G025, G068
  • Morgan Hall: 212A
  • Nursing: 315, 317
  • Physics: 415, 608
  • SMC: G2

 

Attend one of our training workshops for the Wolfvision Cynap devices.  The Cynap system allows you as an instructor to bring your device and connect to your tablet, phone, or laptop wirelessly or to let up to four students in your class connect and share wirelessly.

 

Do you need to figure out what type of technology is available in your classroom?  Check out the Classroom Search tool in MyUTK. This classroom search aids faculty in determining if their assigned classroom meets their needs and can provide a heads up on technology you may not have used before.

 

For assistance using the technology in your classroom, contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Office 365: New Sign-In Coming Soon

The new sign-in experience will available to all Office 365 accounts in October.

 

The new experience will prompt you to enter your username on the first screen followed by your password on a second screen. You can test the new experience now by clicking on the banner in the top right of the current sign-in page. 

 

If you have any questions, please contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900

 


Giving all of your Students a Voice: Designing Effective and Accessible Assessments 

Do you rely on essays, presentations, and multiple-choice exams as the primary or sole means of assessing your students' knowledge and skill?  An upcoming OIT workshop will address how the quality and accessibility of assessments may be enhanced by applying the theory and practice of Universal Design for Learning (UDL).   

 

In the Overcoming Accessibility Barriers in Assessment workshop, participants will have the opportunity to learn effective assessment design methods and immediately apply these methods to their actual courses. In this one-hour workshop, you will have the opportunity to redesign one assessment and be equipped with the knowledge and skills to transform all of your course assessments.  

 

Sign up for the Overcoming Accessibility Barriers in Assessment workshop on Monday, October 2 from 10:10 am-11:25 am or Tuesday, October 3 from 9:40 am-10:55 am. 

 

If you are unable to attend this workshop and want to learn more about designing effective assessments, check out our Lynda.com playlists* https://tiny.utk.edu/AssessmentDesign 

  

*For easy access when subscribing to the playlist, login to Lynda.com first from oit.utk.edu/lynda 

  

If you have questions about these or other OIT workshops, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or at 865-974-9900

 


Hear GTA@OIT Success Stories at ITCoP

Join us on Wednesday, September 27, 12:20 p.m. to 1:10 p.m. in Hodges Library 220E for the Fall 2017 Instructional Technology Community of Practice (ITCoP) kickoff.

 

Bring your lunch and a colleague to join past GTA@OIT Grant recipients in a panel discussion on technology tools that enhance teaching and learning in their courses.  The presenters include Amy Heger, Psychology; Cara Sulyok, Mathematics; and Vincent Price, Theory and Practice in Teacher Education.

For more information, visit the ITCoP website or contact the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900

 


SPSS SamplePower Discontinued

IBM is discontinuing its SPSS SamplePower program. IBM has already stopped marketing the product and, as of September 30, 2017, SamplePower 3.0.1 will no longer be supported by the company. However, there does exist an SPSS Statistics Programmability Extension Command which performs much of the same functionality. Check the IBM SPSS Predictive Analytics Gallery and search for "STATS POWER."

 

For IBM SPSS Statistics versions <= 23.0 FP3 -- Use STATS POWER23 For IBM SPSS Statistics versions >= 24.0 -- Use STATS POWER

 

Either of these extension commands can also be downloaded and installed directly within the IBM SPSS Statistics 23.0 or later client software using the "Extensions -> Extensions Hub" menus.

 

People who have SAS installed can also use the SAS Power and Sample Size application.

 

If you have questions, please contac the OIT HelpDesk at 865-974-9900.

 


Workshops for September 25-29, 2017

Adobe:

Compositing images with Photoshop, September 25, 2017, 10:10 am – 11:10 am

Making Photos Better (Adobe Photoshop), September 27, 2017, 10:10 am – 11:10 am

Adobe Muse (Basics), September 28, 2017, 12:40 pm – 2:40 pm

 

Microsoft:

Microsoft Access 2 (Advanced Techniques), September 27, 2017, 1:25 pm – 3:2 5pm

Microsoft Excel 3 (Advanced Features), September 28, 2017, 9:40 am – 11:40 am

Office 365:  SharePoint Overview, September 29, 2017, 10:10 am – 12:10 pm

 

Research

SPSS 1 (Basics), September 25, 2017, 1:00 pm – 3:00p m

Qualtrics 2 (Reporting and Analysis Tools), September 26, 2017, 10:0 0am – 12:0 0pm

Using Nvivo for Literature Reviews, September 27, 2017, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

R for Text Analysis, September 28, 2017, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

SPSS 2 (SPSS Data Analysis), September 28, 2017, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

Check out our online training offerings (including Lynda.com).

 

All workshops meet on the Knoxville campus. Registration is required for all workshops. If you have questions or need help with registration for any of the workshops listed above, contact the OIT HelpDesk online or call 865-974-9900.

 


October is Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM)

National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) was created as a collaborative effort between government and industry to ensure every American has the resources they need to stay safer and more secure online.

 

Since its inception under leadership from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Cyber Security Alliance, NCSAM has grown exponentially, reaching consumers, small and medium-sized businesses, corporations, educational institutions and young people across the nation. 2017 marks the 14th year of National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

 

With recent legislation and support from the White House, cybersecurity is continuously a popular topic of discussion and rightfully so. More specifically, there is an even stronger focus on consumers and their cyber safety. Everyone at every age is a consumer, and thus this year each theme will focus on the consumer and his/her needs regarding cybersecurity and safety. NCSAM 2017 also marks the 7th anniversary of the STOP. THINK. CONNECT.™ campaign. Each year, NCSAM highlights the overall message of STOP. THINK. CONNECT.™ and the capstone concepts of the campaign, like “Keep a Clean Machine,” “Protect Your Personal Information,” “Connect with Care,” “Be Web Wise,” “Be a Good Online Citizen,” “Own Your Online Presence” and “Lock Down Your Login.”

 

OIT will be promoting NCSAM in October, featuring a different message each week.

 

Week 1, Oct. 2-6, 2017, will feature, “STOP. THINK. CONNECT.™: Simple Steps to Online Safety.”

 

Staying safe and secure online is our shared responsibility. Here is easy-to-follow, actionable advice for everyone. STOP: make sure security measures are in place. THINK: about the consequences of your actions and behaviors online. CONNECT: and enjoy the internet.

 


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