expand Year: 2011
A New Norris House: A Sustainable Dwelling in the 21st CenturyTricia Stuth
Robert French
College of Architecture and DesignDepartment of Architecture

In 1933 the Tennessee Valley Authority constructed a model community, Norris, Tennessee, as part of the Norris Dam construction project. A key feature of this New Deal village was the Norris House, a series of homes built as models for modern and efficient living. In light of the 75th anniversary of the Norris Project, an interdisciplinary team of UTK students and faculty are revisiting the Norris paradigm to create A New Norris House - a sustainable home for the 21st century. Phases include research, design, construction and evaluation to identify and address hurdles to sustainable architectural production and dwelling. The process implements interdisciplinary curricula centered on applied research, government and industry partnerships, and academically based community outreach. Contemporary life creates environmental and societal challenges and technological opportunities similar to those of the New Deal era. A New Norris House confronts both old and new issues to address impediments to the adoption of sustainable principles in existing communities.​

Fall0
This Land is My Land: Religion, Politics, and the Power of Controlling PlacesTina Shepardson
College of Arts and SciencesDepartment of Religious Studies

Ancient religious buildings compete on Jerusalem’s Temple Mount. An American president calls Iraq, Iran, and North Korea an “Axis of Evil.” For thousands of years, physical and rhetorical manipulations of powerful places have fundamentally shaped religious and political identities. My research on fourth-century Christian history suggests that we can better understand – and intervene in – these complex power dynamics if we realize that local places are not inert backdrops against which events transpire, but are ever-shifting sites of, and tools for, the negotiation of authority and identity. From constructing new buildings to describing places controlled by their rivals as morally and physically dangerous, early Christian leaders fundamentally shaped their landscape and thus the events that unfolded within it. Physically controlling the appearance and use of places, and rhetorically shaping perceptions of them, remain powerful, yet largely unrecognized, tools for negotiating the complex intersections of identity, religion, and politics.​

Fall0
Masters Investment Learning CenterLaura Cole
College of Business AdministrationDepartment of Finance

The Masters Investment Learning Center (Masters ILC) is a high-technology learning hub located off the atrium in the James A. Haslam II Business Building. Funded entirely through private donations, by Mike Masters, Chris LaPorte, and many others, this high-profile center provides experiential learning, research opportunities, and enrichment activities that have, to date, transformed the academic experience and marketability of 850 students and faculty campus-wide. The cornerstone of the center is its cache of ten Bloomberg terminals, which enable users to access news, analytics, and financial market data on more than five million securities and provide support to the real-world learning activities offered through the center. Of these many opportunities, the most prominent are the Haslam and LaPorte Torch Funds. Full-time MBA students compete against one another and the S&P 500 while managing real-world security portfolios on behalf of their benefactors and on average consistently outperforming the S&P 500.​

Fall0
Perspectives On INformation TechnologieSPeiling Wang
College of Arts and SciencesDepartment of Information Sciences

Our information environment is becoming increasingly diverse and dynamic. How can we design information technologies that accommodate users from all walks of life? This talk takes the user-centered perspective to challenge current IT system designs. Selected are the six principles/goals or U2SA3: Usefulness—an IT must be useful; Usability—an IT must be usable; Simplicity—KISS; Adaptability—an IT must be adaptable; Adaptivity—an IT must be adaptive; Affordance—an IT’s interfaces must provide adequate clues on actions and results. Violations of these principles are illustrated with examples along with the questions: When and why is default a bad design? What does it mean to personalize IT for users? How can we better understand users’ behaviors?​

Fall0
Embodied Intelligence: Natural and ArtificialBruce MacLennan
College of EngineeringDepartment of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

Intelligence pervades nature; from slime mold amoebas, which self-assemble into a multicellular slug capable of sensation and crawling; to self-organized embryological development, which coordinates the differentiation and arrangement of the 100 trillion cells of an adult person; to the swarm intelligence of social insects, governing millions of individuals without a leader; to the massively parallel information processing of the human brain’s 100 billion neurons. How can we understand such enormously complex systems? And how can we apply our knowledge in future technologies, such as brain-scale neurocomputers and swarms of millions of micro-robots? One key is that natural intelligence is embodied: its primary purpose is to govern a physical body situated in its environment. Indeed, we are beginning to understand that genuine intelligence — both natural and artificial — requires embodiment. These observations yield new insights into the relation of mind and body throughout nature.​

Fall0
[Insert Song Lyrics Here]: The Uses and Misuses of Popular Music Lyrics in Legal WritingAlex Long
College of Law

Legal writers frequently utilize the lyrics of popular music artists to help advance a particular theme or argument in legal writing. Often, attorneys use the lyrics of popular music in fairly predictable ways in their writing, sometimes with adverse impact on the persuasiveness of the argument they are advancing. Occasionally, legal writers incorporate the lyrics of popular music into their writing in more creative and effective ways. This presentation explores the ways in which lawyers and judges use pop music lyrics (and in particular, the lyrics of Bob Dylan) in legal scholarship and judicial opinions, and what their choices in terms of the artists cited say about the legal profession.​

Fall0
Healthcare Reform and Concurrent Care for ChildrenLisa Lindley
College of Nursing

Children with terminal illnesses often need hospice care at end of life, yet most children do not access hospice services. Hospice eligibility rules have been identified as a critical barrier to pediatric hospice utilization. Healthcare reform or the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) is a policy response that modifies hospice eligibility rules for children at the end of their lives. On March 23, 2010, the ACA was signed into law by President Obama, and Section 2302 - Concurrent Care for Children become one of the first provisions to be enacted that same day. The provision eliminated the requirement that children enrolled in Medicaid or state Children's Health Insurance Plan must discontinue life-prolonging or curative therapies in order to enroll in hospice care. Although many provisions of the ACA will be effective in subsequent years (i.e., 2013, 2014), the early enactment of Section 2302 will be an important bellwether of how other ACA provisions are enacted and implemented. Therefore, the aim of this presentation is to discuss the impact of the Concurrent Care for Children provision on the delivery of end of life care for children and review the status of its implementation at the state level.

Note: This is a replacement for the previously scheduled presentation “Health Reform: What’s In It for Me?” by Carole Myers.​

Fall0
HABIT, Overcoming Life’s ObstaclesJohn C. New, Jr.
College of Veterinary Medicine

We encounter obstacles at all stages of our life. To overcome some, we need help. HABIT (Human-Animal Bond in Tennessee) was founded 25 years ago to help people deal with obstacles through the phenomenon of the human-animal bond (H-AB). The Bond is defined as a mutually beneficial, dynamic relationship between people and animals that is essential to the health and well-being of both. As a program of the UT College of Veterinary Medicine, HABIT sponsors animal-assisted therapy in 12 counties and 120 program sites in nursing/retirement homes, assisted living centers, hospitals, and area schools. It is powered by the dedication and compassion of over 300 volunteers, including some from the University. HABIT includes over 350 medically and behaviorally screened dogs, cats and rabbits, and its volunteer teams made over 150,000 visits last year. However, the best way to understand how HABIT volunteers help others deal with obstacles is through their stories.​

Fall0
Count : 16
expand Year: 2012
The Papers of Andrew JacksonDan Feller
College of Arts and SciencesDepartment of History

The Papers of Andrew Jackson is a UT project to publish Andrew Jackson's entire extant literary record in a chronological series of volumes. Now working in Jackson’s presidential years, the project is unearthing material that sheds new light on Jackson’s notorious Indian policy, his famous war against the banks, his path-setting presidential vetoes, and his “spoils system” of executive patronage. The latest volume tells the full story of the “Eaton affair”—a sex scandal that tore apart Jackson’s family and cabinet, prompted him to compare his vice president to Satan, and ended with high government officers gunning for each other in the streets of Washington, DC. The Jackson volumes furnish essential information to historians, biographers, news writers, filmmakers, and Broadway playwrights. Along the way, the project has also solved mysteries, exposed forgeries, and helped to catch thieves. Its work has been featured on primetime television and in internationally syndicated news stories.​

Fall0
Seeing How to Get Things Done!Mandyam M. Srinivasan
College of Business AdministrationDepartment of Statistics, Operations and Management Science

Successful project management is characterized by completing tasks in a timely manner while balancing cost and quality requirements. To meet these targets, managers resort to practices that seem to make perfect sense, but are, in fact, detrimental. For example, to avoid wasting expensive resources, individuals try to make sure everyone has plenty to do, overloading workloads in the process. Such practices bring about ever-changing priorities, distractions, poor multitasking, and delayed completion. The end result is a counterintuitive phenomenon: the more forcefully managers try to move along a project, the more it is delayed, along with an accompanying increase in cost and decrease in project scope, content, and quality. Fortunately, recent developments in project management provide a simple, intuitive, and visual approach to overcome these problems.​

Fall0
Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives of Children’s Development in Slums of Kenya: Considering Culture, Poverty, and CommunityHillary Fouts
College of Education, Health and Human SciencesDepartment of Child and Family Studies

The deleterious impact of poverty on children’s development is well known. Although there is extensive child development research exemplifying this impact, questions remain of how social and cultural aspects of children's lives may influence the impact of poverty. Informal settlements (a.k.a., slums) in Kenya provide a unique context to examine how culture may modify the effects of poverty on child development, as there is tremendous cultural diversity within individual slum communities. Such diversity provides the opportunity to study cultural and individual variation in children’s experiences within one environment. This presentation will highlight a new interdisciplinary and international collaborative involving UT faculty members: Paul Erwin (professor and head of the Department of Public Health), Carin Neitzel (assistant professor of Child and Family Studies), Denise Bates (lecturer in Public Health), and Dawn Coe (assistant professor of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies), Kenyatta University (in Kenya), and a Kenyan NGO (Orphan and Vulnerable Children’s Project of Africa). The collaborative is focused on understanding children’s health and development in informal settlements of Kenya.​

Fall0
To Lynch a Child: Bullying and Gender Non-Conformity in Our Nation’s SchoolsMichael J. Higdon
College of Law

​Although most children are teased at some point during childhood, those children whose gender expression defies what society considers “appropriate” are more likely to become chronic victims of school bullying. Such bullying is, in essence, a form of lynching. First, both are driven by unwritten social codes—in one instance, white supremacy; in the other, gender stereotypes. Second, both are carried out by perpetrators who do not act in isolation. Third, both result in extreme harm—lynching, in its most basic form, resulted in dead bodies; however, a lynching need not be defined so narrowly. The psychological damage that results from chronic bullying can be so damaging as to effectuate a “virtual lynching.” Finally, both lynching and gender-based bullying achieve maximum effectiveness by the way in which they generate fear in others. The clear message of both is the same: obey the “code” or become the next victim.

Fall0
At Shelter’s Edge: The Reality of Homelessness in KnoxvilleDavid A. Patterson
College of Social Work

UT’s commitment to its land-grant mission of serving the public good finds one manifestation in the Knoxville Homeless Management Information (KnoxHMIS), a unique community engagement endeavor to measure, understand, and respond at a local and national level to the complexity and tragedy of homelessness. KnoxHMIS deploys a secure, online database linked to local homeless service providers to create an empirical window into the experience of homelessness. Since November 2004, more than 28,000 unique individuals have sought services for current or imminent homelessness from homeless service providers in Knoxville and Knox County. More than 7,300 individuals and family members received services during 2011. This presentation focuses on the magnitude, scope, and complexity of homelessness in our area. Homelessness is best understood as the result of a complex interaction of individual factors, structural and economic forces, and environmental circumstances. Measurement of the prevalence, persistence, and multifaceted variations of homelessness in this community informs agency interventions and community policy decisions.

Note: Photograph used with permission Knox County Public Defenders Community Law Office. Photographer: I. Merkle​

Fall0
Teaching Plants to Speak the Color OrangeNeal Stewart
College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural ResourcesDepartment of Plant Sciences

Phytosensors are engineered plants to report when specific contaminants and disease-causing agents are present in a plant's environment. Gene switches—called promoters—are being discovered which naturally sense, for example, when a harmful bacterium or virus attacks the plant. They naturally switch on a cascade of defenses. Our research group is designing stronger synthetic promoters, which are then used to control the expression of fluorescent protein genes. The brightest discovered fluorescent protein happens to be orange. However, it is still not bright enough to usually be visible under the control of even our stronger designer promoters. Recently, the group has made modifications to make a “Big Orange” fluorescent protein that is accumulated much higher in the plant, which yields three times higher fluorescence than its predecessor. Plants can be engineered temporarily for orange fluorescence, perhaps just in the leaves, to comprise a brief reporter system.​

Spring0
Vesta, A Virgin No More: A LimerickHarry McSween
College of Arts and SciencesDepartmanet of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Vesta is the second-most massive asteroid. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, now orbiting and mapping the body, has revealed its secrets. Dawn’s ion propulsion system has made it the fastest manmade object. The spacecraft carries cameras to image the surface and spectrometers to measure its composition, and tracking of its orbital path constrains the nature of its interior. Meteorites, which may have been excavated from Vesta, are used to interpret Dawn results, and the distributions of similar volcanic rocks have been mapped. Craters of all sizes pockmark Vesta’s surface. A huge impact created a basin at the south pole that scattered material over half the body, exposed the deep interior, and created curious ridges encircling the equator. Ancient Vesta is one of a very few surviving planetesimals like those that accreted to form the Earth, and thus it provides a unique window on early solar system processes.​

Spring0
Taxing the Internet: Is this good for the US?Bill Fox
College of Business Administration

Internet sales exploded from $1.1 trillion in 2000 to more than $3.8 trillion in 2012. A 1992 Supreme Court ruling hampers the ability of states to collect sales taxes on many of these transactions because the vendors do not have taxable presence. Some argue that a tax-free environment should foster growth of the Internet and that low taxes have been an important part of its rapid growth. Further, they maintain that it is too expensive to comply with the tax laws of 45 sales-taxing states and more than 9,000 local governments. Others argue that uneven taxation of e-commerce versus bricks-and-mortar commerce harms the US economy and costs state and local governments tax revenues. These counterpoints will be evaluated along with UT faculty research that evidences annual tax losses of at least $12 billion and elimination of jobs in bricks-and-mortar stores.​

Spring0
Sport, Peace, and Society: A Local and Global PerspectiveAshleigh Huffman
Sarah Hillyer
College of Education, Health and Human SciencesDepartment of Kinesiology, Recreation, & Sport Studies

​The presentation will highlight our use of sport to promote community development, global solidarity, and female empowerment. In the last twenty years, we have implemented groundbreaking sports development projects in ten different countries, including Iran, Iraq, Israel, Turkey, Jordan, Tunisia, Morocco, China, Inner Mongolia, and Zimbabwe. In the fall of 2010, we also co-developed an undergraduate service-learning class designed to use sport, physical activity, and recreation as a way to assist a growing number of Iraqi refugees in their transition to the Knoxville community. As a result of our international experiences and local service, we have been invited to launch the Center for Sport, Peace, and Society at the University of Tennessee. The center will be the academic hub for interdisciplinary research in the area of sport for development.

Spring0
Crowdfunding: Where Social Networking Meets Venture CapitalJoan M. Heminway
College of Law

The meteoric rise of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other social networking web sites presents many opportunities and challenges for law, society, and the economy. With small businesses—historically engines of economic growth—finding it difficult to raise start-up funds and capital for new projects, social networking seems like a logical way to find new "friends" from whom to raise the necessary investment dollars. This form of raising monies has become known as “crowdfunding,” and has been popularized by websites like Kiva and ProFounder. Yet, securities regulations in the US effectively prevent ventures from using the Internet to raise funds that generate returns to investors because of required compliance with a resource-intensive federal and state registration process. The main fear of regulators is that investors will be defrauded on the faceless Internet. Can we legalize desired forms of crowdfunding without creating an opportunity for fraud and other misuse?​

Spring0
Health Reform: What's In It for Me?Carole R. Myers
College of Nursing

The complexity of the problems which led to the passage of national health reform in 2010 after 100 years of failed attempts, current political bickering, and national concern about America's financial viability and social supports have crowded out the public's opportunity to garner factual and relevant information about the Affordable Care Act and understanding about the personal impact of the law. An overview of the major thrust of the law and key provisions related to health insurance and delivery system reforms, cost-savings, and financing will be discussed. In addition, the timing and status of the law's multi-year implementation will be reviewed and potential obstacles discussed. The question “what's in it for me?” will be discussed from the perspective of those individuals insured via public and private programs and those who lack insurance. The aim is to demystify and simplify the law in a discussion absent of partisan and philosophical debates.​

Spring0
Companion Animals in Translational Imaging-Based ResearchAmy K. LeBlanc
College of Veterinary Medicine

Molecular imaging, specifically Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT), is integral to the clinical management of human patients with a variety of diseases, most notably cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurologic conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, as a noninvasive tool for biomedical research and drug development, PET/CT is a powerful tool for researchers and more recently, an expanding field in clinical veterinary medicine. It is now widely accepted that companion animals such as dogs and cats can serve as spontaneous, relevant disease models for many common human ailments. Novel PET imaging reagents can be validated in such animal models in order to inform the development pathway of these molecules, to the benefit of humans and pets alike. This presentation highlights work demonstrating the application of 18F-PET tracers utilizing PET/CT imaging to a variety of veterinary diseases, thus paving the way for UT as a leader in translational imaging-based research.​

Spring0
Count : 24
expand Year: 2013
Reflections on Designing Products for TodayRyann Aoukar
College of Architecture and DesignInterior Design

Aoukar will discuss four products that he has designed. The first, a leather bracelet, is inspired by paper folding and cutting techniques to eliminate production steps. The second product, a salad bowl with a strainer, explores recycling methods and asks the question: is recycling a function as effective as recycling a material? The third product, a vase, examines our relationship to flowers as ephemeral and symbolic of life and death. The final product, a chair, considers the story and the history that an object expresses and leaves behind to future generations as a symbol of the human experience. Depicted: salad bowl and strainer.​

Spring0
Everybody Wants Her! The Marketing Battle of the CenturyDaniel J. Flint
College of Business AdministrationMarketing and Supply Chain Management

The coveted shopper is female, and everyone wants to understand and connect to her. Relationships between brand manufacturers, retailers, and shoppers have become heated and complicated, even chaotic. However, the game has also risen to a new level. The shopper now has power and choices. Retailers and brand manufacturers are frantically trying to differentiate from their competitors to win her loyalty. Traditional advertising is not effective with her anymore. Social media and many other developments have complicated matters. Now, brands and retailers are working together in entirely new ways to reach her. However, these far more complex marketing and merchandizing efforts have created numerous business and societal challenges. Research based on psychology, social psychology, neurology, behavioral economics, strategy, web analytics, business analytics, supply chain management, and more is attempting to understand and solve these challenges in this “shopper marketing” space. It’s fascinating and crucial for business, society, and her success.​

Spring0
FUTURE: Postsecondary Education for College Students with Intellectual Disabilities and AutismDavid F. Cihak
College of Education, Health and Human Sciences

The prevalence of students with intellectual disabilities and autism is increasing, and they have limited opportunities after high school. As the number of students identified with an intellectual disability grows, the number of postsecondary programs will need to grow as well. In an attempt to increase options, the University of Tennessee admitted its first class of college students in fall 2011 into the FUTURE program. The FUTURE program offers a two-year certificate that focuses on career development and life skills training for students with intellectual disabilities and autism. This presentation describes FUTURE, including the students’ college experiences regarding coursework and work-based internships. In addition, research conducted on postsecondary education will be presented. Specific research studies include: (a) faculty and student attitudes and beliefs about FUTURE-like programs, (b) program impact on educational mentors, (c) career interest survey development for this population, and (d) digital literacy inclusion and supports to improve employment opportunities.​

Spring0
Visionary Mnemonics: The Master-of-All-TradesMohamed Mahfouz
College of EngineeringBiomedical Engineering

The professions of today are increasingly interdisciplinary. For example, a farmer must know both biology and chemistry to determine the type and the quantity of fertilizer to purchase. To be successful in a discipline, one must know almost everything about anything. A qualified biomedical engineer should know topics ranging from biology and anatomy to electronics and material science. Imaging advances in medicine allow physicians to see inside and diagnose patients without ever opening the skin. Combining knowledge of anatomy, mechanical and biomaterial sciences allows biomedical engineers to replace degenerative joints. Biomedical engineers must utilize effective means to acquire the knowledge that they require and convey to others how a seemingly minute detail impacts the rest of a system. Visionary mnemonics methods, mind maps, and organic charts are used to promote intelligence assimilation of knowledge from a vast sea of information.​

Spring0
Stem Cell Research and Therapy at the University of TennesseeMadhu Dhar
College of Veterinary MedicineDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Sciences

Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering are the new frontiers of regenerative medicine. Stem cell research has the potential to substantially improve equine medical care. Researchers at the UT College of Veterinary Medicine isolate adult stem cells from bone marrow, fat or peripheral blood, characterize them in culture and then provide them to the clinic for therapy. Stem cells grown in a dish with tissue culture techniques must exhibit three criteria: one is their capability of self-renewal, i.e. stem cells undergo multiple cell divisions while maintaining their undifferentiated state; two is the potential to differentiate into fat, bone, and cartilage; and third is that all stem cells should express a certain set of protein markers. The prospective clinical use of stem cells holds enormous promise for improved treatment of a large number of diseases in horses.​

Spring0
Exploring the Urban ForestSharon Jean-Philippe
College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural ResourcesUrban Forestry

​Urban ecosystems have unique problems and are difficult to study. Because their disturbance history is often unknown, there are multiple stresses that may be difficult to differentiate in urban forests, and the characteristics of the urban soils are quite different than those found in rural forests. Trees in urban environments are chosen to enhance and beautify cities, but are also called upon to: 1) adapt to poor soils that have often been polluted; 2) compete with grass for nutrients and water; 3) develop roots under impervious surfaces, like concrete; 4) resist disease and insect pressures; and 5) endure abuse from automobiles, lawnmowers, pests, and people. This presentation examines urban forests from an economic, environmental, and management perspective, specifically focusing on understanding the below-ground soil environment in which urban trees grow and how to mitigate stressors in urban soils.

Fall0
“Well, at least it’s a dry heat…”: Roman Soldiers at ‘Ayn Gharandal on the Arabian FrontierErin Darby
Robert Darby
College of Arts and SciencesDepartment of Religious Studies

Located in one of the most extreme physical environments on earth, the archaeological site of ‘Ayn Gharandal, Jordan, lies along the eastern frontier of the Late Roman and Byzantine empires and contains a fort, a bathhouse, and an aqueduct system. For the past four years, the ‘Ayn Gharandal Archaeological Project, under the direction of Robert Darby and Erin Darby, has surveyed and excavated structures at the site, where even the preliminary results promise to contribute greatly to our understanding of the Late Roman military and its control of regional trade networks, civilian populations, and natural resources in the Middle East. This presentation will demonstrate the importance of ‘Ayn Gharandal by first describing the regional and environmental context, discussing the preliminary finds from survey and excavation, and drawing conclusions from the data about the Late Roman army’s presence in this desolate region and the soldiers garrisoned at ‘Ayn Gharandal.​

Fall0
Let’s Break Down Some Walls: Using Business Process Modeling and Integrated Software As a Platform For Integrating Business EducationAnita Hollander
College of Business AdministrationInformation Management Collateral and Concentration

Like many business organizations, College of Business academic units, are organized by departments or functions (such as finance, marketing, logistics, human resource management, etc.). This can result in professionals who view the business from a single, functional area perspective. However, successfully managing business processes in today’s dynamic business world requires a cross-functional, integrated perspective. Business faculty must prepare students who can help break down traditional business walls. Hollander’s presentation will give an overview of how UT information management faculty are developing and using business analysis techniques, combined with technology platforms that integrate business process data, to foster multifunctional, innovative thinking in College of Business Administration students. The curriculum resources and tools are designed to be transferrable to students and faculty in multiple departments and functional areas across the college.​

Fall0
Listening Between the Lines: The Micro-Analysis of Everyday TalkTrena Paulus
College of Education, Health and Human SciencesDepartment of Educational Psychology and Counseling

With all of the hype around “big data” it can be easy to overlook the impact of everyday talk on our lives and institutions. Participants in the Discourse Analysis Research Team in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences have been using micro-analysis of talk to explore how language is used to accomplish a variety of tasks in both online and offline conversations. This presentation will highlight some of these findings, including how Tennessee’s definition of “teacher effectiveness” was generated in policy conversations in Nashville (Rachael Gabriel, Theory and Practice in Teacher Education), how female NFL followers perform their identity as authentic fans (Traci Yates, Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies) and how the recently bereaved enter online support groups (Mary Alice Varga, Educational Psychology and Counseling). A better understanding of what everyday conversations are doing can help us develop strategies for positive change.​

Fall0
Professionalism: The Redheaded Stepchild of Legal Education Reform?Paula Schaefer
College of Law

​In 2007, two reports on the state of legal education provided similar critiques. Law schools do a good job teaching legal doctrine, but need to do a better job integrating practice skills and professionalism training into the curriculum. Despite the call for reform, many law professors in the United States are skeptical about teaching professionalism. Professionalism may very well be the redheaded stepchild of legal education reform. As a redheaded stepchild herself, Schaefer can appreciate the message the phrase is meant to convey. The redheaded stepchild is obviously different and does not belong. She is treated without the favor of birthright. In this presentation, Schaefer considers why professionalism has been deemed different and unworthy, and what legal education reformers should do to change this misconception.

Fall0
Public Service, the Not Always So Academic Arm of the College of Social WorkElizabeth R. DeGeorge
College of Social WorkPublications and Media Technology

The Social Work Office of Research and Public Service (SWORPS) has been in existence since 1975. It is what you might call an outreach of the College of Social Work. Social workers are “people people,” and can’t just sit back at an academic armchair’s length from the action in social services. Having a public service office has allowed the College of Social Work to remain in close contact with this action in the public and private service agencies of the state. From partnering with the State of Tennessee in overseeing the quality of child care agencies to managing the collection of service information for the homeless population of Knoxville; from creating civil rights training for the Department of Human Services to partnering with UT’s Center for Literacy Studies in developing online learning modules; from directing focus groups for our own university to coordinating survey studies for the Knox County Health Department; from evaluating social service programs to helping service providers articulate program outcomes,  the work of SWORPS impacts individuals and agencies throughout region while allowing the college to maintain a first-hand relationship with cutting-edge best practice in today’s world.​

Fall0
Count : 22
expand Year: 2014
The Genesis of Spanish: Conquest, Caves, CentralismGregory Kaplan
College of Arts and SciencesDepartment of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures

​Valderredible, a valley of some 300 km2 in the northern Spanish province of Cantabria, is a special place for its artistic heritage, which provides a vision of why the Spanish language, or Castilian, was born in the region. Monuments that testify to this phenomenon include a unique nucleus of cave (or rock-cut) churches from the seventh century AD. A series of fascinating images will accompany Kaplan’s narration of a story that began upon the arrival of Latin to Cantabria in the third century BC. The native Cantabrian language survived long enough to impact spoken Latin, and Spanish took on a new form. After the sojourn and death in the Valley of Saint Millán (474–574 AD), the speech of Millán’s cult followers acquired the prestige to propel the dissemination of Spanish as the language of Castile.

Spring0
My Life as a Flight InstructorTerry L. Leap
College of Business AdministrationDepartment of Management

Learning to fly and earning a private pilot certificate is a challenging and expensive endeavor. As an FAA-certificated flight instructor, Leap taught his clients about the mechanics of airplanes, pre-flight procedures, aerodynamics, basic maneuvers, aircraft systems, air traffic control procedures, cross-country flight planning, federal aviation regulations, and more. His presentation will focus on the salient features of learning to fly. The audience will learn what it takes to become a safe and proficient pilot and, he hopes, the presentation might stimulate someone’s interest in this enjoyable hobby.​

Spring0
Dirt Don’t Hurt!Dawn P. Coe
College of Education, Health and Human SciencesDepartment of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies

Physical activity guidelines recommend that young children participate in at least sixty minutes and up to several hours of developmentally appropriate physical activity each day. During early childhood, children begin spending a significant portion of time at daycare and preschool settings, which presents a key opportunity for young children to engage in activity through unstructured play on a playground. Traditional playgrounds utilize set structures (i.e., swings, monkey bars) and sport-related areas (i.e., tracks, fields) to provide children with different activity options. New trends have emerged that incorporate natural elements (i.e., boulders, trees stumps, and logs) into outdoor play environments – commonly known as natural playgrounds. Natural playgrounds also include recycled materials (i.e., ropes, tires) into areas where children can create a variety of play scenarios. This presentation will provide an overview of outdoor play and natural playgrounds as well as the current research our laboratory is conducting in this area.​

Spring0
Gas Hydrates – Nuisance or Natural Energy Source and Sequestration MediumClaudia J. Rawn
College of EngineeringDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering

When water and low-molecular weight gases, like methane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen disulfide, combine at low temperatures and modest pressures, crystalline gas hydrates are formed. These conditions are met where gas hydrates are found on the continental margins, in permafrost, and in natural gas pipelines. The latter is a nuisance to the gas and oil industry and leads to pipeline plugging, resulting in production interruption and financial loss. Estimates of the amount of methane contained in naturally occurring gas hydrates vary greatly but they represent a sizeable quantity. It would be challenging to harvest the methane from the seafloor due to the way the hydrate deposits are distributed in sediments. Production from permafrost locations show more potential. One possible method would be to inject carbon dioxide into methane hydrate rich deposits to drive the release of the methane molecules while at the same time sequestering the carbon dioxide molecules.​

Spring0
Life Begins and Ends with a KiSS.Brian Whitlock
College of Veterinary MedicineDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Sciences

The spread of tumor cells from a primary tumor to other parts of the body (metastases) is the most life-threatening complication of cancer and is responsible for most cancer deaths. In 1996, scientists set out to identify genes responsible for suppressing metastasis and made exciting new discoveries in cancer research. One gene was expressed uniquely in nonmetastatic cells. The gene was named KiSS for its role as a metastasis suppressor sequence (SS) – with acknowledgment of the discovery’s occurrence in Hershey, Pennsylvania, and the Hershey’s chocolate Kiss. The central functions of KiSS in regulating reproduction were unnoticed until 2003, when three groups independently reported mutations of the KiSS receptor in humans and mice suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a syndrome characterized by delayed or absent pubertal development. This presentation highlights the roles of KiSS in the beginning (reproduction) and ending (cancer) of life and ongoing research at the UT College of Veterinary Medicine.​

Spring0
Educating Lawyers in an Age of Arm Chair ActivismKarla McKanders
College of Law

​1960s lawyers were known for spearheading the Civil Rights, anti-Vietnam War, Women’s and Student movements, which transformed the U.S. justice system. Contrastingly, in the digital age, “armchair activists” post about civil rights violations from the comfort of their homes. While many students still pursue a legal degree to enter into a service-oriented career, others question whether training lawyers to be “change agents” is an idea of the past. This presentation centers on the Clinical Legal Education model, which has the dual goals of educating future lawyers and providing quality legal assistance to individuals without access to the justice system. The presentation asks whether there are present-day ideological impediments that inhibit the inculcation of a “change agent” perspective in today's future lawyers. This inquiry is explored through examining the local and international service learning projects in which The University of Tennessee’s Immigration Clinic has engaged in Knoxville, Swaziland, and Morocco.

Fall0
Culturally Congruent End-of-Life Care for Rural AppalachiansSandra Mixer
College of Nursing

​While the process of dying is a universal human experience, it amplifies peoples’ cultural similarities and differences. Professional nurses have a duty to provide culturally congruent care that is satisfying, meaningful, and beneficial, fits with peoples’ daily lives and, in this context, helps them face end of life (EOL). This study addressed a gap in the literature by discovering the culture care EOL needs of rural Appalachian persons and their families at home. Themes abstracted related to faith, family care, integrating generic/folk and professional nursing care, hospice care decision-making, and recommended nursing interventions promote a satisfying death experience for this population. Since death is a part of life that eventually affects everyone, applying knowledge about personal and family values, beliefs, and practices at EOL is essential for promoting physical, emotional, and spiritual health, addressing health disparities, and facilitating a dignified death among rural Appalachians. 

Fall0
What Makes a Democratic Leader? George Washington's Epic FailChristopher P. Magra
College of Arts and Sciences

​Can we say that the American Revolution brought about democratic change if there were undemocratic elements in that revolution? Is it possible that George Washington was both a freedom fighter and a tyrant? What is the nature of democratic leadership? This talk will answer all these questions, and more. In under 400 seconds.

Fall0
Getting Fruved and Changing the WorldSarah Colby
College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences

​With the global obesity crisis, why we eat what we eat and how we can change weight-related behavior have become areas of intense focus. Imagine students and researchers, from diverse academic backgrounds and university locations, working together to change behavior and environments using creative, interactive, fun, and novel approaches. That is what Getting Fruved is all about. The project will involve more than 1,000 student researchers, 30 faculty and extension researchers, 25 sub-research projects, and 13 universities working together in a 5-year, USDA-funded, 4-H project designed to ultimately decrease the proportion of older adolescents/young adults who are overweight or obese. The goal of the project is to use an interactive, peer-led, social marketing environmental intervention designed by college students to aid older adolescents/young adults in effectively managing weight through: improved dietary quality, increased physical activity, and improved stress management skills.

Fall0
Water in Urban Philippines: When Every Drop CountsLisa Reyes Mason
College of Social Work

Water is essential for human health and well-being. In many places, access to water is unequally distributed among households and is both an environmental and social concern. In Baguio City, the Philippines, some families can easily obtain the water that they need. Others struggle and must juggle portfolios of water from many sources such as the public utility, private tanker trucks, neighbors, urban springs, rainfall, and their own greywater. This presentation describes the water situation in a Baguio City neighborhood, highlighting water disparities among households and everyday experiences of water insecurity. Examining how specific financial, physical, and social resources relate to water helps explain who gets water, how, and why. To ensure that all families have the water that they need, social programs and policies are needed alongside infrastructure and technology solutions.

 

Fall0
Speaking to a Five-foot OpossumEmily Bivens
College of Arts and Sciences

​I assume everyone has moments they were not prepared for and then are not satisfied with what they said or did. These moments of regret can replay in one’s mind creating nagging feelings of unresolvedness or an open loop. I have come up a solution to resolve this difficult situation. In a recent project I created a proxy for that moment by offering people a chance to speak privately with a five-foot opossum in a state of apparent death. Audience members were able to close their loops by redoing unsatisfactory conversations or interactions. After five-minutes the audio of the interaction with the seemingly unaware animal is played back into the gallery giving the speaker the chance to be both the deliverer and receiver of a message. In this talk I will discuss interactive art practices, the use of proxies and the value of opossums.

Fall0
Count : 22
expand Year: 2015
How is a Butterfly's **** Like a Novel? Nature and Art in Nabokov's Scientific ArchiveStephen Blackwell
College of Arts and SciencesModern Foreign Language and Literatures

In 6 years of laboratory work, Russian-American novelist Vladimir Nabokov made at least 1,500 scientific drawings of butterfly genitalia and wings—mostly of the former.  In an upcoming book, co-editor Kurt Johnson and I are presenting 150 of these drawings along with several essays by various specialists.  Nabokov’s approach to studying butterfly anatomy was characterized by a fascination with the temporal depth of species, and he imagined using a time machine to describe the staggered arrival of various old-world species in North and South America.  He found that butterfly organs, like novels, make allusions to one another between species. He also showed that their microscopic genitalic structures include comically self-referential forms as well as allusions to entirely unrelated, radically different species. Nabokov’s literary art displays the same kinds of time-travel, structure and referentiality that he found in these highly adapted creatures.

Spring0
A Very Early Date for Prehistoric Cave Use in the Eastern WoodlandsJan F. Simek
College of Arts and SciencesAnthropology
Around 6,500 years ago (if not before), prehistoric Native Americans explored deep into the dark zone of Tennessee’s 49th Unnamed Cave, perhaps buried their dead in the mouth of the cave, and may have made petroglyphs on the cave wall.  This age is older by nearly 800 years than evidence previously identified as eastern North America’s earliest dark zone cave use.  The 49th Unnamed Cave has a checkered history of looting, reburial, and difficulties with resource protection, and these issues will be discussed in light of its archaeological record.

Spring0
Examining the Darker Sides of Interpersonal CommunicationCourtney N. Wright
College of Communication and InformationCommunication Studies

Conflict is a natural and inevitable event that contains the potential to produce both danger and opportunity. The catalysts for and implications of this paradox are at the core of the study of the dark side of interpersonal communication. Wright’s research interests in the positive and negative influences of relational communication and conflict on well-being have focused on the investigation of three communication behaviors through which the darker sides of interpersonal communication can manifest: social confrontation, social influence, and paradoxical forms of communication. This presentation provides an overview of her research of these phenomena in close relationships and instructor-student interactions about grades.

Spring0
Mission to Mars!: The UT Research Behind the QOA Microchip for NASA's Curiosity Rover Currently Exploring MarsBen Blalock
College of EngineeringAnalog Electronics

Along with two of my research students, Stephen Terry and Robert Greenwell, I partnered with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a NASA Center of Excellence for robotic space exploration, in the design and development of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Quad Operational Amplifier (QOA) microchip. This microchip is used in the Curiosity’s motor controller electronics for wheel motors, robotic arm actuator motors, camera positioning motors, and other functions. Over ninety copies of the QOA microchip are used on the MSL Mars rover, distributed on the periphery of the Curiosity. The QOA microchips are exposed to the ambient environment on the Mars surface, subjected daily to −120°C to +20°C temperature swings.  No commercially available electronic component could meet JPL’s rigorous requirements, including potential re-use for asteroid missions. This presentation provides an overview of the past research effort at UT behind the QOA chip for Mars…and beyond.

Spring0
Lessons From Saturday Morning Cartoons: Wile E. Coyote and Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis SoftwareDavid P. Atkins
University LibrariesBranch Libraries and Collection Logistics

Acme provided Wile E. Coyote with the tools and technology he applied in his pursuit of The Road Runner.  While at times these products failed, often times it was The Coyote’s own misuse that precipitated his regular Saturday morning mishaps. Qualitative researchers also use technology in the form of Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) to pursue their quarry. While the application of CAQDAS seldom results in qualitative disasters, the landscape of scholarly publications illustrates how little we really know about its use. Are scholars closing in on their objectives, or are they running off a cliff?  I will share the findings of a collaborative research study conducted with colleagues from the University of Georgia and the University of Tasmania, Australia, where we analyzed 763 journal articles to characterize both who is using two popular CAQDAS programs and how they are reporting this use.

Spring0
Beyond Combat: The Phenomenological Experience of Military Personnel, Veterans, Families, and CommunitiesCamille Hall
College of Social Work
The current wars in Afghanistan and Iraq represent America’s longest continuous combat engagement.  We are now challenged with both a military that is exhibiting the stress-related consequences of these long and multiple combat deployments and a rapidly growing veteran population in need of a wide range of combat-related physical and mental health care services. Every community in the United States has been affected, and service delivery systems are trying to respond. There is an urgent need to understand and engage with the military service members, veterans, their families, and their communities in effective practices. This presentation draws from research data that explore the effects of deployment and combat stress on the physical and mental health of U.S.- veterans, active duty service members, and their families. Cultural relativity and universality of responses to traumatic events related to armed conflict and war are also highlighted.
Fall0
Imperfect Information on Phyiscal Activity and Caloric IntakeMatt Harris
College of BusinessCenter for Business and Economic Research
Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data, I find that individuals who overestimate their activity level by one standard deviation consume 40-60 extra calories per day, or enough to gain five pounds per year. These extra calories are composed mainly of sugar and carbohydrate, and are concentrated among individuals in the 75th and 90th percentiles of caloric intake. The link between overeating and inaccurate estimation of physical activity is strongest among less educated individuals and individuals with high variance in their physical activity, suggesting that imperfect recall or information gaps explain at least part of the relationship of interest. These results imply the existence of a necessary condition for information treatments to be effective in changing health behaviors and obesity rates.

Fall0
Reading under the Blackened Mess: Revision and the Eighteenth-Century NovelHilary Havens
College of Arts & SciencesEnglish
Criticism of the eighteenth-century novel and work in the burgeoning field of print culture have often neglected the importance of the process of revision, perhaps because the “actual sight of…revisions,” as D. A. Miller memorably describes it, can be “nonetheless as disturbing as if, at the bottom of a vase filled with beautifully arranged flowers, we had caught a glimpse of thin filigrees of blood where the stems had been cut.”  Using empirical textual evidence, I will show how these “disturbing” acts of revision reveal insights about an author’s creative process through their intersections with social networks, literary reviews, serial publication, and the author’s own previous writings. This project, which aims to construct a new narrative about the eighteenth-century creative mind, makes use of my development of new digital paleographical methodologies to recover deleted text, which are a contribution to the field of digital humanities.

Fall0
Dog TalesTami Wyatt
College of Nursing

It can be said that dogs have supernatural powers; not just specialty bred and trained dogs but all dogs—even your untrained pets.  With the extraordinary gift of sensing, dogs rely on this gift to trust, work, serve, heal, and be present.  A dog’s keen hearing and sense of smell and taste reveal secrets that are not obvious to you. Dogs are aware of the most intimate knowledge about you including your bodily functions, romantic and eating habits and yes, even fear, anxiety and sadness. Let’s examine dog tales and how these tales are true.

Fall0
Grade Calculus: Playing Games with Undergraduate Education and Letting Them Take Responsibility for LearningBrandon Horvath
College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural ResourcesDepartment of Plant Sciences

How many times have we heard, “I only need to get a 75 on this exam to get (insert grade desired here)”? I’ve heard it throughout my short career, and a few years ago, I decided to engage in my own version of “grade calculus”. Examining this generation, we know them to be digitally native, and many of them engage in various forms of games. From casual games to serious MMORPG’s, students from this generation are engaged in playing games. After investigating the dynamics that make games work, and drive people to be engaged by them, I decided to employ such dynamics in my classroom. Much of this engagement resides in Kahneman & Tversky’s Prospect Theory which defines how people behave when these is something to gain or lose. By changing the language surrounding typical assessments, and altering the grade scale a bit, students are now in charge of their destiny as they choose what ‘level’ they would like to pursue in my classes. This presentation will show how game dynamics from the same games students play outside class can increase their engagement in class.  

Fall0
Connecting Landscapes with Rivers: Challenges and Future DirectionsThanos Papanicolaou
College of EngineeringCivil and Environmental Engineering

Landscapes are the lynchpin of rural communities and our emphasis here is on land conservation.  Past research guiding conservation efforts has a fragmented view by assuming that the economics of the rural systems biotic clock will function without the non-economic parts.  Human nature was viewed as decoupled from the non-human.  Furthermore, these efforts have somewhat failed to recognize that we live in a constantly evolving world that is disturbed by intense human activity (agriculture) and shifts in climate.  Surprisingly, there is no national modeling framework for the rural environment that could be used to assess conservation practices while considering, at the same time, complex social and natural system dynamics.  In this research, our long-term vision is to identify scientifically the ecological, economic, and ethical leverage points, or metrics, that have the greatest impact on our ability to achieve conservation goals.  Because we live in a continuously evolving world, we also believe that our biophysiecological dynamic models should be complemented with decision making tools to examine trade-offs and enhance our ability to constantly re-evaluate conservation goals.  While many regional or local efforts achieve in part this decision-support function, new opportunities to take advantage of emerging geoinformatic infrastructure and dynamic modeling tools that capture human and non-human responses and interactions create the need for a new modeling paradigm in nearly all agriculture regions of the country.

Fall0
Count : 22
expand Year: 2016
Re:Learning, Technology, and College StudentsPatrick Biddix
College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences

Two decades of research and anecdotal belief implies students are hyper-connected, faculty are dis-connected, and the inability of the two to resolve this digital divide limits learning potential. My research explores questions about how students use technology in their classroom and extended learning environments. Specifically, I have focused on how learners interact with technology and how their learning process is influenced (or not) by such interactions. In this presentation, I offer some considerations from my work in international contexts. The findings I share challenged my previous notions about technology, leading me to reconsider student learning in the “digital” era.

Spring0
Exploring Asteroids: A Window into Solar System HistoryJosh Emery
Arts and Sciences

​Before the Earth formed, the Solar System swirled with a large number of small, rocky bodies that later grew into the planets we know today.  Most of those rocks were long ago ejected from the Solar System or swallowed by the Sun and planets.  A small fraction (but still more than a million) remains today, now known as asteroids, providing an important window through which we can view the earliest history of our planetary neighborhood.  Far from benign, however, asteroids have literally impacted the history of the planets, leaving their mark on the geology and biology of Earth.  Researchers at UT (faculty and students) are actively involved in remote characterization of asteroids and in NASA’s ongoing and upcoming spacecraft exploration of asteroids.  The OSIRIS-REx mission, scheduled to launch on Sept 8, will be NASA’s first attempt to bring samples from an asteroid back to Earth.​

Spring0
Movement and Meaning, a Sculptural PursuitJohn Powers
Arts and Sciences
Sculpture historically has been associated with statuary and architecture, though the last century and a half has seen rapid and extensive expansion of what art is, how it is made and what it can do. The discipline of sculpture in particular has grown, reaching beyond traditional materials like stone, wood and bronze to encompass virtually any physical material as well as “non-materials” like light, sound and motion. Considering the unique and special possibilities of time and literal physical movement as compositional elements, I will share both historical examples as well as my own work as we explore movement as a vehicle for meaning in sculpture.
Spring0
Epidemics of the Less Glamourous Marcy Souza
Veterinary Medicine

Wildlife species are disappearing from the planet at an alarming rate, and often these extinctions are at least in part due to the actions of humans.  Charismatic mega-fauna such as elephants, rhinos and polar bears often make the headlines, but many other less glamourous species are also facing serious threats.  Three infectious diseases, white nose syndrome, chytridiomycosis, and snake fungal disease, are currently affecting wildlife populations in North America.  However, the media has focused little to no attention on these problems when compared to the problems of more charismatic species.  Can humans appreciate the intrinsic value of all wildlife species?  Can we understand that the health of humans, animals and our ecosystems are intricately intertwined?       ​

Spring0
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles…..and ??: Some Points to Ponder About TransportationShashi Nambisan
Engineering

Transportation systems are woven into the fabric of our daily lives - from meeting desires for individual mobility to serving trade and commerce related requirements.  We now are at a crossroads working with legacy systems while planning for uncertain future demands. We face numerous needs and wants, juxtaposed with opportunities afforded by technological advancements, all of which exist in a setting with a multitude of challenges and constraints. These include socio-political aspects, and considerations such as economics, energy, environment, efficiency, expediency, equity, and ethics (7 Es). This presentation will highlight these with reference to the elements that constitute transport systems:  users, vehicles, and networks while recognizing safety to be the prime focus. It will touch upon the balance between individual and societal optima, the potential role of emerging technologies (e.g., Google car, connected vehicles and infrastructure), and data-enabled decision support systems to guide policy and operational strategies for transport systems.​

Spring0
Fulbrighting with FamilyBrad Collett
School of Landscape Architecture

Expanded professional perspectives, deepened academic knowledge, and a brand new course are among the many things I bring back to the University of Tennessee following my recent Fulbright experience in Ljubljana, Slovenia. It was enriching in every sense of the word. Add my wife and two school-aged children to the mix and new definitions of the word ‘adventure’ emerge.  This presentation surveys our experience Fulbrighting as a family, its triumphs, tribulations, and tomfoolery that made it the life-changing experience that it was. 

Fall0
Mindfulness: a promising individual-level solution for health disparities experienced by sexual minority peopleJennifer M. Jabson
Education, Health, and Human Sciences

Sexual minority people (individuals who identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual) experience health and health-related disparities compared to heterosexual people. Excess stress, caused by chronic, cumulative minority stress occurring in addition to daily life stress and stressful life events, is the prevailing explanation for health disparities experienced by sexual minority people. Therefore, eliminating health disparities in these groups requires addressing stress. Rural sexual minority people may be at the greatest risk for excess stress due to socially conservative, geographically isolated, qualities that can characterize rural regions. Mindfulness-based stress reduction programs have been successful at reducing stress in clinical and nonclinical groups and may be an individual-level solution for health disparities experienced by sexual minority people.  This presentation will introduce mindfulness-based stress reduction and its potential value as an individual-level solution for excess stress among sexual minority people. A feasibility study with rural sexual minority women will serve as an example.​

Fall0
This Is Rocky Top Jaclyn Johnson
School of Music
What is the soundtrack to Tennessee? What fills Tennesseans with a sense of community and pride? For those here in Knoxville, and particularly and the University of Tennessee, the anthem heard loud strong is Rocky Top. Music has accompanied the University of Tennessee along its great traditions of scholastic and athletic accomplishments for decades, and although music may appear superficial, it is an important component to ensuringthe legacy of future Volunteers. 
Fall0
The uncertainty is the hardest part: Communicating about health and navigating ambiguous illness trajectoriesLaura E. Miller
Communication & Information

How do we manage illness-related uncertainty in the face of an unpredictable health trajectory? Is it possible to feel certain, despite ambiguous health recommendations, opinions, and prognoses? By improving our ability to communicate about health, we will be better equipped to manage illness-related challenges and tackle the health uncertainties of the future. 

Fall0
The Legacy of Phineas Gage: Healing from TraumaRagan Schriver
Social Work

In 1848 Phineas Gage had an accident in which a metal rod shot through his head, impacting the frontal cortex of his brain. What seemed like a life threatening event became an icon of the resiliency of the human brain to recover from trauma in that Gage was able to function well post trauma. The concept of human resiliency from trauma has surged in recent years through quality research programs such as the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACEs) study and lead to evidence based treatment modalities for those who’ve experienced trauma. The College of Social Work has harnessed this research to provide MSSW students with a certificate program in Trauma Treatment. Capitalizing on its trauma treatment knowledge, the college has formed a partnership with Catholic Charities USA and AmeriCorps to support veterans, a population which quite often deals with extensive trauma, through a trauma-informed, peer-to-peer casework program which has yielded positive results for participants.

Fall0
Count : 21
expand Year: 2017
Additive Manufacturing and the New Tickle College of Engineering Innovation and Collaboration StudioChris Wetteland
Matthew Young
College of Engineering
"The ability to make things is fundamental to the ability to innovate things over the long term." -- Willy Shih, Harvard Business School 
 
Many of the greatest innovations in America over the last century share a birthplace that most college students are without access to a common household garage. In a world that is becoming increasingly digital, students need a hands-on space to explore, tinker, experiment, and invent; a place to transfer classroom concepts into personal experiences. Furthermore, UT and partner ORNL are on the forefront of the excited new field of advanced manufacturing. To support both these endeavors, we have developed the Innovation and Collaboration Studio (ICS). The ICS is a type of laboratory often referred to as a maker space. These spaces typically include 3D printers, machining tools, electronic components, computer work stations, and hand tools. Here we present the facility and goals of the studio. ​
Spring0
From Homer to Hip-Hop: Comparative Verbal Arts and the Classical MuseJustin Arft
Arts & SciencesClassics
While Homer's Iliad and Odyssey hold a preeminent place in the Western literary canon, their form, style, and construction are decidedly oral and traditional. Moreover, oral poetry is one ofthe world's oldest and most complex art forms andremains alive and well in cultures around the globe today. This presentation will give an overview of how we came to see Homer asoral poetry, an insight that not only changed the way Classicsunderstands these monumental ancient epics, but one that continues to invite comparison to oral poetries around the world, from Beowulf to the Basquebertsolaritza to hip hop. A quick peek at Homer's encoded, poetic mechanics lends an appreciation for the artistry of verbals arts, old and new.

Spring0
Microbial Dark Matter: Life on Earth Just Got a Lot More ComplicatedKaren G. Lloyd
Arts & SciencesMicrobiology

For hundreds of years, microbiologists have been growing as many different kinds of microbes as possible in petri dishes. Given this huge effort, it was assumed that most of the major branches of the tree of life had been discovered. However, now we have the technology to read the DNA sequences of every microbe in a drop of water or mud, on the back of our hands, or in a wastewater treatment plant. And, it turns out that we microbiologists have missed many of the large, deeply-rooted branches on the tree of life. These strange microbial cells are likely to be very different from any microbes we’ve ever known. I’ll show my lab’s newest estimates of how abundant they are in different environments, as well as one theory about why some of them have eluded all those efforts to grow them, and what they might be doing to help/hurt the Arctic.​

Spring0
Working with Community Partners to Create Beneficial Experiential-Learning OpportunitiesNick Geidner
Communication & InformationJournalism

As faculty across the university are being asked to integrate more experiential learning into the curriculum, we must work with numerous community partners — such as governmental, non-profit and/or media organizations — to create meaningful projects that simulate a real-world environment and have impact. This presentation will outline practical concerns, benefits, and takeaways of working with community partners to create courses or class projects using this style of engaged pedagogy.​

Spring0
Marginalia in the Shaheen Antiquarian Bible CollectionChris Caldwell
University Libraries

Marks in books, known as marginalia, can make every copy of the same book unique. Who owned this book in the past? What notes did each person make in the margins? Where has the volume traveled? This presentation will highlight marginalia in UT Libraries’ Shaheen Antiquarian Bible Collection. Acquired in 2011, its 250 volumes include Bibles from the 16th through 20th centuries and were used by Shakespeare scholar Naseeb Shaheen to trace the Bard’s many uses of early modern Bible translations. In an effort to emphasize the unique histories of books as objects and occasional canvases for human interaction, two UT librarians investigated the Shaheen collection for evidence of readers’ handwritten marginalia and ownership marks through the centuries. Revealed are some of the ways that these particular books have been cherished and abused, for reasons both spiritual and earthly. ​

Spring0
Detecting Loose Nukes Jason Hayward
EngineeringNuclear Engineering

Detecting loose nukes is a very difficult problem.  This involves both protecting one's borders-- land, air, and sea-- and having the capability to find a loose nuke in a particular search area.  The Rad IDEAS group (radideas.utk.edu) at UTK works mainly on new technologies to address this challenge.  This includes new scanning systems for ports of entry and wearable, trailer-based, or autonomous systems capable of searching for materials like uranium and plutonium.​

Spring0
The Juvenile Record MythJoy Radice
Law

Little attention has been given to the far-reaching impact of juvenile delinquency records, partly because many people believe that juvenile records are not public, especially after a juvenile turns 18. That common notion is a myth. No state completely seals juvenile delinquency records from public view. Some states even publish juvenile records online with adult criminal records. This presentation illuminates the variety of ways states treat juvenile records—revealing that state confidentiality, sealing, and expungement provisions often provide far less protection than those terms suggest. Yet, recent literature on juvenile brain development and recidivism research by criminologists support new arguments for why juvenile delinquency records should not follow a juvenile into adulthood. Only through a comprehensive approach of confidentiality, sealing, and nondisclosure statutes can states truly remove the stigma of a juvenile record to rehabilitate and reintegrate a juvenile back into society. 

Fall0
Young People’s Engagement with Literature: What Does It Look Like?Susan L. Groenke
Stergios Botzakis
Education, Health, and Human Sciences

In school-related news, we hear a lot about adolescent reading achievement, often characterized by students' test scores on reading comprehension measures. But what does it mean to be an engaged reader? What do young people choose to read on their own, for fun? What do young people choose to read when given opportunities to choose? What does engagement look like, and why does it matter? What does reading and writing look like online? In 20 slides in 20 seconds, Drs. Groenke and Botzakis share insights gained from their research about what adolescent readers choose to read and compose when given choice. Texts like graphic novels, series books, and books about celebrities or popular culture are often pooh-poohed by teachers, but they engage adolescent readers! Join us to find out why and how!

Fall0
Lessons in Leaving: Understanding Informal Causes of Retention and TurnoverTimothy Munyon
Haslam College of Business

Workplace turnover occurs when the employment relationship ends between an employer and employee. Such turnover is costly and negatively impacts firm performance, and significant resources are spent by organizations each year to reduce the incidence of voluntary turnover. Yet, although organizational and job-related factors often influence turnover, there is an informal side to turnover and retention where political influence and relationships affect who stays and who leaves. In this presentation, I briefly introduce and unpack some of the ways in which employees informally cause turnover and retention of their co-workers, and explain the efficacy of these actions in accelerating or slowing one's propensity toward turnover.

Fall0
Are “Sincerely Held Principles” Really Just Prejudice?: The Counseling Discrimination Law and LGBT Mental Health in TennesseePatrick R. Grzanka
Arts & Sciences

In 2016, the Tennessee legislature passed a bill mandating that “No counselor or therapist providing counseling or therapy services shall be required to counsel or serve a client as to goals, outcomes, or behaviors that conflict with the sincerely held principles of the counselor or therapist.” The law’s architects claimed it would prevent clients from infringing on counselors’ religious liberties, while LGBT advocates insisted that the law was designed for one purpose: to enable discrimination in mental health care. We assessed what sexual and gender minorities in Tennessee actually think about the law, and many believe that it is designed to harm them. Our results suggest that awareness of the law effects some LGBT Tennesseans’ levels of psychological distress and willingness to conceal their sexual and gender identities. What does this mean for the future of this law, and for the future of LGBT mental health in Tennessee?​

Fall0
The Multisensory Eating ExperienceCurtis Luckett
Institute of Agriculture

In our everyday life, we are constantly perceiving sensory inputs from multiple different sources. More specifically to my lab, when we sit down for a meal we are constantly inundated with sights, sounds, smells, and tastes that create our eating experience. These sensations are not processed independently, inputs from one modality influence the perception in another. For example, the color of a beverage can influence our sweetness perception and sounds affect how pleasant you perceive odors. In our lab, we use the principles of food science, neuroscience, and experimental psychology to investigate these phenomena. In addressing these interactions, we can better understand how the brain processes information as well as create a more pleasurable eating experience. I’ll show my lab’s research on the eating experience, highlighting work done on how sound, texture, taste and smell interact.

Fall0
Count : 22